Cooperative Research Units
Education, Research And Technical Assistance For Managing Our Natural Resources
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Education

Courses Taught

  • Raptor Ecology and Conservation (Clint Boal 2017)
  • RNR 495A/595a – Communication Skills in Conservation (Scott Bonar 2017)
  • Aquatic Contaminants and Toxicology (Colleen Caldwell 2017)
  • Research Presentations (Courtney Conway 2017)
  • Writing Scientific Manuscripts_Directed Study teaches students how to write peer-reviewed manuscripts (Courtney Conway 2017)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics A combination journal club of recent genetics literature and seminar course where students present their current research. (Melanie Culver 2017)
  • Analysis of Animal Populations (Katie Dugger 2017)
  • baeR - Data Management and Manipulation in R (Thomas Edwards 2017)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management Graduate seminar course that provides an introduction to the principles and practice of structured decision making and adaptive management and its application in natural resource management. Students become familiar with the application of quantitative decision modeling tools and apply these methods to natural resource problems. (Angela Fuller 2017)
  • Public Involvement Principles & Techniques This course is designed to provide students aspiring to work in fisheries and wildlife or other natural resource management fields, whether at the federal, state, local level of government or an NGO, with a basic level of understanding of the public involvement principles and techniques.

    Course Objectives
    1. Have an understanding of what it means for an agency to have a public involvement philosophy.
    • Be able to recognize and describe situations when public involvement is needed.

    2. Knowledge of the 14-15 basic objectives of public involvement and an understanding of matching strategy with objective.

    3. Be familiar with a wide range of public involvement strategies (about 10 of the common general techniques will be discussed in class).
    • Be able to list the strengths & weaknesses of 10-12 of the more common public involvement strategies.
    • Have a working knowledge of the key principles necessary for successfully implementing the more common public involvement strategies.

    4. Be able to design a public involvement program (i.e., understand the basic components needed).

    5. Be familiar with the basic components of facilitation and running effective meetings.

    (Larry Gigliotti 2017)
  • Fisheries Ecology Lectures and discussions will be used to provide an interactive exploration of the ecology of fishes related to management and conservation. Topics include: foraging and predator-prey theory, reproduction and early life-history, habitat selection and niche theory, competition, fish biodiversity, and response to anthropogenic climate change. (Tim Grabowski 2017)
  • Communication in Ecological Sciences (Christopher Guy 2017)
  • Wildlife Conservation An introduction to the ecological and management principles associated with the fields of fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology. Topics include population ecology and assessment, resource management, and environmental legislation (Dave Haukos 2017)
  • Salmon Population Assessment (Mark Henderson 2017)
  • Ecology and Management of Riverine Systems (Elise Irwin 2017)
  • Conservation Physiology Lecture and discussion course focused on physiology and physiological field techniques to support the study of wildlife and fish populations (Patrick Jodice 2017)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2017)
  • R Programming for Biologists At the completion of the course, students will be able to: (1) understand the basic components of R such as functions and data structures; (2) read in and manipulate data formatted as a .csv file; (3) write functions, loops, and conditionals; (4) create graphs; and (5) code basic statistics that are commonly used in biology. Most importantly, this course will teach students how to think like a programmer and how to obtain and understand help documents. The overall goal of the course is to give students the tools necessary to tackle new tasks in R that were not covered in the course. The course will be split into two main themes: learning the principles of R programing (weeks 1-8), and learning how to code statistical analyses in R (weeks 9-16). (Wes Larson 2017)
  • Professional Skills Basic skills needed to be a successful scientist (Martha Mather 2017)
  • Avian Ecology and Managemnt Seminar on Avian Ecology and Applications (Conor McGowan 2017)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Leandro Miranda 2017)
  • Bayesian Modeling for Conservation Science The objectives of this course are to develop a basic understanding of and appreciation for Bayesian principles for the solution of problems in natural resources science; to gain practical experience in constructing, evaluating, and interpreting models under the Bayesian framework; and to explore classes of models useful for conservation science. (Clinton Moore 2017)
  • Stream Fish Conservation (Craig Paukert, Nick Sievert 2017)
  • Quantitative Decision Analysis for Fish and Wildlife Management Natural resource managers often are faced with difficult decisions on how to satisfy the socio-economic needs of the public while conserving or restoring ecological systems. To aid in the decision-making process, the decision sciences have developed approaches that allow decision makers to: examine the expected effects of different strategies before implementation; incorporate multiple objectives and values of stakeholders; determine the relative influence of various sources of uncertainty; and estimate the value of collecting additional data. Adaptive management, a special case of decision analysis, is used to reduce uncertainties through monitoring, increasing the value of management. Despite the potential advantages, quantitative decision analysis and adaptive management are not used widely in natural resource management, with the exception of a few notable conservation efforts. To this point, a primary impediment to the broad-scale application of quantitative decision analysis has been a lack of training opportunities for natural resource students and professionals in the concepts and methodology. This course is intended to fill that gap by providing quantitatively- oriented students in natural resources and related fields with the skills needed to interpret and conduct complex quantitative decision analysis for managing animal populations. (Jim Peterson 2017)
  • Managed Aquatic Systems (Kevin Pope, Mark Pegg 2017)
  • Advanced Fisheries Techniques (Michael Quist 2017)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Michael Quist 2017)
  • Reservoir Ecology and Management (Mark Rogers 2017)
  • Aquatic Community Ecology This class will cover our current understanding of organismal community ecology in Streams, lakes, and wetlands. We will discuss regional patterns in species diversity, species interactions, community structures, ecosystem processes, and disturbance and succession in these environments.

    (Amanda Rosenberger 2017)
  • Analysis of Fish and Wildlife Populations Parameter estimation and modeling for vertebrate populations (Beth Ross, 2017)
  • Wildlife Research Design This course will provide students with exposure to the philosophy of science and critical thinking, important foundational work regarding wildlife study design and implementation, and an understanding of basic statistical tools and techniques that may be useful in their own research. (Joshua Stafford 2017)
  • Quantitative Methods in Ecology (Tyler Wagner 2017)
  • Applied Spatial Ecology Methods for managing and analyzing ecological datasets are constantly evolving. Advances in technology have resulted in large spatial datasets for aquatic and terrestrial populations that requires data compilation and analysis for making sound resource management and conservation decisions. From traditional estimators of home range and resource selection in R to spatial epidemiology of disease in WinBUGS, this course will provide hands-on learning for manipulation and analyses of ecological datasets for a variety of taxa. You will develop skills in understanding and processing complex datasets while learning traditional and innovative methods for spatial data analysis. (W. David Walter 2017)
  • Advanced Topics in Stream Ecology (Annika Walters 2017)
  • Waterfowl Ecology and Management Ecology and management of North American waterfowl and their habitats. Laboratory exercises will focus on identification, life histories, sex and age determination, and survey methods. Lectures and discussions will cover taxonomy, ecology, behavior, population dynamics, harvest management, and habitat management and conservation. (Lisa Webb 2017)
  • Current Topics in Avian Conservation Graduate seminar focused on current topics in bird conservation. (David Andersen 2016)
  • Large Mammal Ecology, Management, and Conservation (James Cain 2016)
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes What makes a fish, a fish. Course covers physiological basis of fish biology. Students gave me 99% out of 100% approval rating. (Colleen Caldwell 2016)
  • Aquatic Trophic Ecology (Steven Chipps 2016)
  • Research Presentations (Courtney Conway 2016)
  • Writing Scientific Manuscripts teaches students how to write peer-reviewed manuscripts (Courtney Conway 2016)
  • Conservation Genetics Covers the basic principles of genetics and genomics as relevant to fish and wildlife management and conservation. Includes topics on evolution, population genetic processes, and topics of interest to managers such as forensics and invasive species. (Melanie Culver 2016)
  • Conservation Genetics Laboratory Covers the basic methods of conservation genetic laboratory analyses. DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and data analyses as applied to a real wildlife project. (Melanie Culver 2016)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics Seminar course required for all students with a major or minor in Genetics, and all other interested students. Students present their research, we discuss current journal papers, and we have invited speakers. (Melanie Culver 2016)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics A combination journal club of recent genetics literature and seminar course where students present their current research. (Melanie Culver 2016)
  • Research Concepts A required coarse for all new MS students (optional for PhDs) to introduce them to concepts, approaches, techniques, and methodology involved in scientific research. All students prepare their first written draft of their graduate research proposal and present their proposal to the department in a conference-like setting at the end of the semester. (Stephen DeStefano 2016)
  • Advances in Ecology (Duane Diefenbach 2016)
  • Population estimation and modeling (Duane Diefenbach 2016)
  • Conservation Biology and Modeling This course covers basic principles of conservation biology; students build models to solidify their understanding. (Terri Donovan 2017)
  • Principles of Modeling with Spreadsheets / Population Dynamics (Terri Donovan 2016)
  • Biometry - Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2016)
  • Landscape Genetics (Angela Fuller 2016)
  • Advanced Human Dimensions: A Scientific Approach to the Social Environment of Natural Resource Management This course is designed to provide students aspiring to work in fisheries and wildlife or other natural resource management fields, whether at the federal, state, or local level of government or an NGO, with an understanding of the social aspects of management and some practical applied human dimensions skills, via readings of a broad range of human dimensions literature and discussions of human dimensions concepts applied to natural resource issues. (Larry Gigliotti 2016)
  • Dynamics and Management of Wildlife Poplations (Barry Grand 2016)
  • Wildlife Population Analysis (Barry Grand 2016)
  • Analysis of Wildlife Populations (Barry Grand 2016)
  • Communication in Ecological Sciences (Christopher Guy 2016)
  • Fisheries Science (Christopher Guy 2016)
  • Habitat Ecology and Management (Dave Haukos 2016)
  • Wildlife Conservation (Dave Haukos 2016)
  • FWCB Graduate Faculty Seminar (Mevin Hooten 2016)
  • UGA WILD8360: Quantitative Conservation Science (Brian Irwin 2016)
  • UGA WILD8300: Structured Decision Making and Adaptive Mangement The goal of this seminar is to introduce students in natural resources management to the principles and practices of structured decision making (SDM). (Brian Irwin, Clinton Moore 2016)
  • Ecology and Management of Riverine Systems (Elise Irwin 2016)
  • Advanced Studies in Fisheries Management (Dan Isermann 2016)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resource Professionals This course teaches students how to prepare manuscripts for submission to scientific journals, how to prepare proposals, how to prepare press releases, and how to interact with the peer-review publication process. (Cecil Jennings 2016)
  • Spatial ecology of seabirds Reading course focused on collection, analysis, and interpretation of spatial data for nearshore and pelagic seabirds (Patrick Jodice 2016)
  • Design and Analysis of Mark-Recapture and Occupancy Studies Design and analysis methods for estimating abundance and vital rates of marked individuals; and occupancy, colonization, and local extinction modeling based on presence/absence data. (Bill Kendall 2016)
  • Science Communication (Sammy King, Megan La Peyre 2016)
  • Wetlands and Wildlife Ecology (Sammy King 2016)
  • Wetlands of the Pacific Northwest This field-based course is an intensive examination of select National Wildlife Refuges and state Wildlife Management Areas in northern California and southeastern Oregon. The course will provide students with first hand experience in wetland processes and water conflicts in an arid environment. (Sammy King 2016)
  • Wildlife Management Techniques The course is intended to familiarize students with techniques used in the management of wildlife populations. (David Krementz 2016)
  • Fish & Wildlife Seminar We reviewed individual student research projects and read current publications in the area of their research. (David Krementz 2016)
  • Management of Small Impoundments (Thomas Kwak 2016)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2016)
  • Natural Resources Policy: Policy Sciences Analysis This course examines the history and development of natural resources policy within the United States, and internationally. The course uses a framework for policy analysis to evaluate current issues. (Megan La Peyre 2016)
  • Integration of GIS and remote sensing data analysis in natural resource applications (Cyndy Loftin 2016)
  • Social Dimensions in Aquatic Ecology (Jim Long 2016)
  • Biometry: Experimental design and data analysis for Biologists (Dan Magoulick 2016)
  • Professional Skills Professional Skills, BIOL 863, Kansas State University, Cotaught with L. Johnson, J. Guikema, Spring; 2016. Includes proposal writing, professional presentations, ethics, networking, and other skills needed to thrive in graduate school. (Martha Mather 2016)
  • Fish Physiology The course will study the different systems of the fish and how they interact such as digestive, locomotion, sensory, etc. (Pat Mazik 2016)
  • Advanced Techniques in Wildlife Population Analysis Seminar type class reviewing advanced statistical techniques in wildlife populations analysis (Conor McGowan, 2016)
  • Applied Ecological Modeling (Conor McGowan 2016)
  • Management of Impounded River Basins (Leandro Miranda 2016)
  • Animal Ecophysiology/Advanced Animal Ecophysiology This course is designed for students interested in vertebrate physiology and relationships with the environment; physiological adaptation; comparative physiology; aquatic toxicology; and conservation biology. (Reynaldo Patiño 2016)
  • Future of Fisheries Discusses professional development and careers of fisheries professionals. (Craig Paukert 2016)
  • An introduction to data management and R for Fisheries and Wildlife applications Includes lectures and interactive computer exercises. We attempt to employ an interactive classroom environment to explore the tools researchers and managers use to create, manipulate, and analyze datasets with R software. The beginning of the course consists of an introduction to the R environment with emphasis on the importance of creating a database that is functional, error free, and easily analyzed. We then focus on using R software to manipulate datasets and conduct analyses. (Jim Peterson, Jefferson Deweber 2016)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Jim Peterson, Adam Duarte 2016)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Lab) (Jim Peterson, Adam Duarte 2016)
  • Quantitative Decision Analysis for Fish and Wildlife Management Natural resource managers often are faced with difficult decisions on how to satisfy the socio-economic needs of the public while conserving or restoring ecological systems. To aid in the decision-making process, the decision sciences have developed approaches that allow decision makers to: examine the expected effects of different strategies before implementation; incorporate multiple objectives and values of stakeholders; determine the relative influence of various sources of uncertainty; and estimate the value of collecting additional data. Adaptive management, a special case of decision analysis, is used to reduce uncertainties through monitoring, increasing the value of management. Despite the potential advantages, quantitative decision analysis and adaptive management are not used widely in natural resource management, with the exception of a few notable conservation efforts. To this point, a primary impediment to the broad-scale application of quantitative decision analysis has been a lack of training opportunities for natural resource students and professionals in the concepts and methodology. This course is intended to fill that gap by providing quantitatively- oriented students in natural resources and related fields with the skills needed to interpret and conduct complex quantitative decision analysis for managing animal populations. (Jim Peterson 2016)
  • Quantitative Fishery Assessment (Kevin Pope 2016)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Michael Quist 2016)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2016)
  • Stream Ecology Ecological principles applied to flowing waters. Emphasis on ecological processes within algal, invertebrate and fish communities. The influence of geomorphic processes, hydrologic principles and physical-chemical factors on the biota. Covers current concepts, methods, and applications of landscape and community ecology in the study of fluvial ecosystems. Themes include scale and hierarchy theory, landscape processes, metapopulations, process domains, disturbance regimes, and ecosystem dynamics. (Amanda Rosenberger 2016)
  • For the Love of Rivers Discussion of the book, "For the Love of Rivers" by Kurt Fausch for the OSHER Lifelong Learning Institute with University of Missouri Extension (Amanda Rosenberger 2016)
  • Dam Removal Practicum (Allison Roy, 2017)
  • Aquatic Ecology (Allison Roy 2016)
  • Controversial Conservation Topics In this literature seminar, we will discuss a suite of controversial conservation topics, exploring different sides of the scientific debate surrounding these issues and exploring feedbacks among science, policy, management, and public perceptions. The objective of the class is to encourage students to think critically about the science behind conservation issues and be aware of the complex manner in which conservation issues are communicated across scientists, decision makers, and the public. The class will be divided into four topic sessions:
    • Status of global fisheries
    • Ecosystem reference baselines
    • Monetization of nature
    • Conservation triage
    (Suresh Andrew Sethi 2016)
  • Ornithology The biology of birds, including evolution, functional morphology, physiology, ecology and behavior. Field and museum laboratories emphasize particular aspects of morphology, ecology and behavior, as well as taxonomy and identification. (Ted Simons 2016)
  • Applied Spatial Ecology Methods for managing and analyzing ecological datasets are constantly evolving. Advances in technology have resulted in large spatial datasets for aquatic and terrestrial populations that requires data compilation and analysis for making sound resource management and conservation decisions. From traditional estimators of home range and resource selection in R to spatial epidemiology of disease in WinBUGS, this course will provide hands-on learning for manipulation and analyses of ecological datasets for a variety of taxa. You will develop skills in understanding and processing complex datasets while learning traditional and innovative methods for spatial data analysis. (W. David Walter 2016)
  • Advanced Fisheries Management (Annika Walters 2016)
  • Wetland Ecology and Management This class will provide an introduction to wetland ecological principles, communities, processes, and functions, and their application toward conservation and management of wetlands and wetland dependent organisms. The objectives of this course are to help students increase their understanding of wetland ecosystems, as well as the tools and techniques used to manage wetlands, and enable them to apply this understanding in future wetland research, conservation and management. (Lisa Webb 2016)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2016)
  • Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management The course provides fish, wildlife, and conservation ecology graduate students with an understanding of how social, cultural, behavioral, and demographic characteristics affect management of wild life. (Alexander Zale 2016)
  • Graduate Seminar – Fish Physiology (Joseph Zydlewski 2016)
  • Raptor Ecology and Conservation Survey of North American birds of prey, their ecology, applicable research methods, and conservation actions and issues. (Clint Boal 2015)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation Co-taught with J. Gaeta

    WATS 3110 laboratory
    (Phaedra Budy 2015)
  • Graduate Induction Class- Lake Fish Ecology Held in Bear Lake, UT (Phaedra Budy 2015)
  • Wildlife-habitat Relationships (James Cain 2015)
  • Aquatic Contaminants and Toxicology (Colleen Caldwell 2015)
  • Advanced Topics in Fish & Wildlife Science (Courtney Conway 2015)
  • Fish & Wildlife Graduate Seminar (Courtney Conway 2015)
  • Writing Scientific Manuscripts teaches students how to write peer-reviewed manuscripts (Courtney Conway 2015)
  • Conservation Genetics Covers the basic principles of genetics and genomics as relevant to fish and wildlife management and conservation. Includes topics on evolution, population genetic processes, and topics of interest to managers such as forensics and invasive species. (Melanie Culver 2015)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics Seminar course required for all students with a major or minor in Genetics, and all other interested students. Students present their research, we discuss current journal papers, and we have invited speakers. (Melanie Culver 2015)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics A combination journal club of recent genetics literature and seminar course where students present their current research. (Melanie Culver 2015)
  • Population estimation and modeling (Duane Diefenbach 2015)
  • Applied Ecology, Environment, and Society (Terri Donovan, 2015)
  • Analysis of Animal Populations This course is designed to teach students quantitative methods for estimating vital rates and demographic parameters of animal populations (i.e., survival, abundance, occupancy). Emphasis is on vertebrate animals and statistical methods of hypothesis testing, parameter estimation, and inference testing. This course is offered odd-numbered years. (Katie Dugger 2015)
  • statR3 - Analysis of Variance Techniques in R (Thomas Edwards 2015)
  • statR4: Basic Regression Techniques in R (Thomas Edwards 2015)
  • statR5: Categorical Methods in R (Thomas Edwards 2015)
  • baseR – Data Management and Manipulation in R (Thomas Edwards 2015)
  • statR1 - Research Design (Thomas Edwards 2015)
  • statR2 – Descriptive Statistics and Basic Graphs in R (Thomas Edwards 2015)
  • Physical Processes in Freshwater Ecosystems (Jeff Falke 2015)
  • Stream Fish Community Ecology (Jeff Falke 2015)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management Graduate seminar course that provides an introduction to the principles and practice of structured decision making and adaptive management and its application in natural resource management. Students become familiar with the application of quantitative decision modeling tools and apply these methods to natural resource problems. (Angela Fuller 2015)
  • Human Dimensions of Widlife (David Fulton 2015)
  • Public Invovlement Principles & Techniques This course is designed to provide students aspiring to work in fisheries and wildlife or other natural resource management fields, whether at the federal, state, local level of government or an NGO, with a basic level of understanding of the public involvement principles and techniques.

    Course Objectives
    1. Have an understanding of what it means for an agency to have a public involvement philosophy.
    • Be able to recognize and describe situations when public involvement is needed.

    2. Knowledge of the 14-15 basic objectives of public involvement and an understanding of matching strategy with objective.

    3. Be familiar with a wide range of public involvement strategies (about 10 of the common general techniques will be discussed in class).
    • Be able to list the strengths & weaknesses of 10-12 of the more common public involvement strategies.
    • Have a working knowledge of the key principles necessary for successfully implementing the more common public involvement strategies.

    4. Be able to design a public involvement program (i.e., understand the basic components needed).

    5. Be familiar with the basic components of facilitation and running effective meetings.

    (Larry Gigliotti 2015)
  • Field Ichthyology Distribution, life-history, and habitat associations of Texas freshwater, estuarine, and marine fishes. Field identification and collection methods emphasized. Field trips required. (Tim Grabowski 2015)
  • Communication in Ecological Sciences (Christopher Guy 2015)
  • Wildlife Conservation (Dave Haukos 2015)
  • Hierarchical Modeling in Ecology (Mevin Hooten 2015)
  • UGA WILD8360: Quantitative Conservation Science (Brian Irwin 2015)
  • Decision Support Tools for Adaptive Management (Elise Irwin 2015)
  • Adaptive Fish and Wildlife Management This course focuses on a formal approach to making decisions about managing wildlife and fish populations, using tools of management science. We will discuss the development of each of the elements of an informed decision process: management objectives, decision alternatives, predictive models, and monitoring program. Given these elements, we will discuss methods for deriving an optimal, or close to optimal, decision in the face of various sources of uncertainty: competing hypotheses about the ecology of the system, partial controllability of the system, and partial observability of the system. We will discuss how results from management actions can be used to reduce uncertainty (resolve competing scientific views). (Bill Kendall 2015)
  • Restoration and Management of Wetland Functions This courses provides students with a systems based understand of wetlands and how wetland processes can be manipulated to benefit wildlife. (Sammy King 2015)
  • Animal Space Use and Selection Seminar (David Krementz 2015)
  • Wetlands Ecology and Management (David Krementz 2015)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2015)
  • Natural Resources Policy This course is designed to equip graduate students with a basic understanding of the importance of policy in managing renewable natural resources in the U.S. We will review the history of natural resources policy, its foundations in law, and discuss current issues as well as recurring issues in policy. We will focus on public policy including regulatory laws to protect resources, increases in the use of incentives, especially in federal agricultural policy, public land management, and the controversies of mandating management on private lands. Students will select a regional, national or international policy issue they find interesting and present an overview of the issues, conflicts, and the key players for that policy issue, as well as lead the class discussion about alternative policy that has or could be implemented to address the issue.
    (Megan La Peyre 2015)
  • Integration of remote sensing and GIS in natural resources management (Cyndy Loftin 2015)
  • Introduction to R (Dan Magoulick 2015)
  • Professional Skills (Martha Mather 2015)
  • Applied Ecological Modeling How to develop models of ecological systems for making predictions in decision management contexts (Conor McGowan 2015)
  • Interdisciplinary Modeling of High Latitude Global Change (Dave McGuire 2015)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Leandro Miranda 2015)
  • Bayesian Modeling for Conservation Science The objectives of this course are to develop a basic understanding of and appreciation for Bayesian principles for the solution of problems in natural resources science; to gain practical experience in constructing, evaluating, and interpreting models under the Bayesian framework; and to explore classes of models useful for conservation science. (Clinton Moore 2015)
  • Applied dendrology This course provides wildlife graduate students dendrology and plant sampling skills that can be applied to wildlife habitat investigations where structural and plant species composition is quantified for species-habitat relationships and other applications. (John Organ 2015)
  • Plant Community Ecology This course provides wildlife graduate students applied plant community ecology skills. Students sample different forest stands and identify the relationships of geology, surficial geology, soils, herbaceous, and woody plant composition. Students will apply their knowledge of wildlife ecology to development of a stewardship plan for forest wildlife habitat conservation. (John Organ 2015)
  • An introduction to data management and R for Fisheries and Wildlife applications Includes lectures and interactive computer exercises. We attempt to employ an interactive classroom environment to explore the tools researchers and managers use to create, manipulate, and analyze datasets with R software. The beginning of the course consists of an introduction to the R environment with emphasis on the importance of creating a database that is functional, error free, and easily analyzed. We then focus on using R software to manipulate datasets and conduct analyses. (Jim Peterson, Michael Colvin 2015)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Jim Peterson, Jefferson Deweber 2015)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Lab) (Jim Peterson, Michael Colvin 2015)
  • Quantitative Decision Analysis for Fish and Wildlife Management Natural resource managers often are faced with difficult decisions on how to satisfy the socio-economic needs of the public while conserving or restoring ecological systems. To aid in the decision-making process, the decision sciences have developed approaches that allow decision makers to: examine the expected effects of different strategies before implementation; incorporate multiple objectives and values of stakeholders; determine the relative influence of various sources of uncertainty; and estimate the value of collecting additional data. Adaptive management, a special case of decision analysis, is used to reduce uncertainties through monitoring, increasing the value of management. Despite the potential advantages, quantitative decision analysis and adaptive management are not used widely in natural resource management, with the exception of a few notable conservation efforts. To this point, a primary impediment to the broad-scale application of quantitative decision analysis has been a lack of training opportunities for natural resource students and professionals in the concepts and methodology. This course is intended to fill that gap by providing quantitatively- oriented students in natural resources and related fields with the skills needed to interpret and conduct complex quantitative decision analysis for managing animal populations. (Jim Peterson 2015)
  • Managed Aquatic Systems (Kevin Pope, Mark Pegg 2015)
  • Scientific Writing, Editing, and Revising in the Biological Sciences (Abby Powell 2015)
  • Fisheries Management (Michael Quist 2015)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Michael Quist 2015)
  • Dam Removal Practicum (Allison Roy, 2016)
  • Research Concepts (Allison Roy 2015)
  • Wildlife Research Design This course will provide students with exposure to the philosophy of science and critical thinking, important foundational work regarding wildlife study design and implementation, and an understanding of basic statistical tools and techniques that may be useful in their own research. (Joshua Stafford 2015)
  • Hierarchical models in ecology The objective of this course is to introduce students to hierarchical models and their application in ecology. The goal is to develop skills and understanding of fitting hierarchical models (i.e., writing model code), interpreting model output, and presenting results. The course will focus on Bayesian estimation of hierarchical models and will use the programming environment R and the program JAGS. (Tyler Wagner 2015)
  • Applied Spatial Ecology Methods for managing and analyzing ecological datasets are constantly evolving. Advances in technology have resulted in large spatial datasets for aquatic and terrestrial populations that requires data compilation and analysis for making sound resource management and conservation decisions. From traditional estimators of home range and resource selection in R to spatial epidemiology of disease in WinBUGS, this course will provide hands-on learning for manipulation and analyses of ecological datasets for a variety of taxa. You will develop skills in understanding and processing complex datasets while learning traditional and innovative methods for spatial data analysis. (W. David Walter 2015)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2015)
  • Population Dynamics (Dana Winkelman 2015)
  • Aquatic Entomology 665 Taxonomy and Ecology of Aquatic Insects and other Invertebrates (Mark Wipfli 2015)
  • Climate Change Seminar Covers major topics on climate change (Mark Wipfli 2015)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2015)
  • Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management The course provides fish, wildlife, and conservation ecology graduate students with an understanding of how social, cultural, behavioral, and demographic characteristics affect management of wild life. (Alexander Zale 2015)
  • Special Problems in Wildlife Ecology (Independent Study) (Joseph Zydlewski 2015)
  • biodiversity conservation & environmental sustainability (Paul Angermeier 2014)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (Clint Boal, 2014)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resources Conservation (Clint Boal 2014)
  • Fisheries Management (Scott Bonar 2014)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation (Phaedra Budy 2014)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation Laboratory (Phaedra Budy 2014)
  • Graduate Studetn Induction - Lake Fish Ecology Held in Jackson Hole, WY (Phaedra Budy 2014)
  • Large Mammal Ecology, Management, and Conservation (James Cain 2014)
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes (Colleen Caldwell 2014)
  • Independent Study in Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation Introduction to sea turtle life history, nesting ecology, threats, and research and conservation techniques. (Raymond Carthy 2014)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2014)
  • Aquatic Trophic Ecology (Steven Chipps 2014)
  • Decision Analysis for Conservation and Management of Natural Resources Conservation and natural resource management decisions are complex. Often, decision-makers must select from among multiple possible decisions in the face of limited data and uncertain outcomes. This course will introduce students to a structured approach to break down complex decisions into manageable units, model predicted outcomes of alternative decisions, and monitor observed outcomes as part of an adaptive management process. (Jaime Collazo, Krishna Pacifici 2014)
  • Fish & Wildlife Graduate Seminar (Courtney Conway 2014)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Ecology (Courtney Conway 2014)
  • Conservation Genetics Covers the basic principles of genetics and genomics as relevant to fish and wildlife management and conservation. Includes topics on evolution, population genetic processes, and topics of interest to managers such as forensics and invasive species. (Melanie Culver 2014)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics Seminar course required for all students with a major or minor in Genetics, and all other interested students. Students present their research, we discuss current journal papers, and we have invited speakers. (Melanie Culver 2014)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics Seminar course required for all students with a major or minor in Genetics, and all other interested students. Students present their research, we discuss current journal papers, and we have invited speakers. (Melanie Culver 2014)
  • Research Concepts Course covers the history and philosophy of science, setting up research questions and hypotheses, basic research concepts and study design, and proposal development, writing, and presentation. (Stephen DeStefano, Allison Roy 2014)
  • Advances in Ecology (Duane Diefenbach 2014)
  • Principles of Modeling with Spreadsheets / Population Dynamics (Terri Donovan, Michelle Brown 2014)
  • Biometry - Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2014)
  • Fisheries Division Seminar (Jeff Falke 2014)
  • Ecological Thought: Theory and Principles This interdisciplinary graduate seminar course reviews some of the fundamental concepts and principles that have helped shape the science of ecology.We review foundational concepts and seminal papers in ecology and evolution, and use contemporary applications and developments to discuss how such thinking has evolved and why. (Angela Fuller 2014)
  • Advanced Human Dimensions This course is designed to provide students aspiring to work in fisheries and wildlife or other natural resource management fields, whether at the federal, state, or local level of government or an NGO, with a basic level of understanding of the social aspects of management and some practical applied human dimensions skills.
    Course Objectives
    1. Understand the history and evolution of human dimensions research and application in management (paradigm model).

    2. Be able to define human dimensions and public involvement and why these are important to wildlife management.

    3. Be familiar with major concepts and theories applied in human dimensions.
    4. Be familiar with research tools used in human dimensions.
    (Larry Gigliotti 2014)
  • Field Ichthyology Distribution, life-history, and habitat associations of Texas freshwater, estuarine, and marine fishes. Field identification and collection methods emphasized. Field trips required. (Tim Grabowski 2014)
  • Analysis of Wildlife Populations (Barry Grand 2014)
  • Professional Opportunities in Natural Resources An introduction to resume construction, oral interviews and exposure to career paths and philosophies of various natural resource agencies. (Brad Griffith 2014)
  • Communication in Ecological Sciences (Christopher Guy 2014)
  • Fisheries Science (Christopher Guy 2014)
  • Advanced Spatial Modeling (Dave Haukos, Eugene Albanese 2014)
  • Baysian Statistics in Ecology (Dave Haukos 2014)
  • Wildlife Conservation (Dave Haukos 2014)
  • FWCB Independent Study (Mevin Hooten 2014)
  • UGA WILD8360: Quantitative Conservation Science (Brian Irwin 2014)
  • Structured Decision Making and Adaptive Management The goal of this seminar is to introduce students in natural resources management to the principles and practices of structured decision making (SDM). SDM has long been used in business contexts and in specific natural resource applications such as forest management, but it is now becoming more widely implemented in wildlife and fisheries conservation at local, state, and federal levels. SDM offers a clear collaborative path for managers and scientists; therefore, it represents a departure from the tradition of keeping the scientific and management endeavors apart from one another. The course will also take up adaptive management, a specific application of SDM where decisions are linked through time. The seminar will comprise a 1-hour lecture and 1-hour class discussion per week. The discussions will be based on readings in the primary literature and will be student-led. (Clinton Moore, Brian Irwin 2014)
  • Ecology and Management of Riverine Systems (Elise Irwin 2014)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resources Professionals To help young scientists develop an advanced understanding of and appreciation for the components of effective written and oral scientific communication with a diverse group of
    constituents, including peers, supervisors, administrators, politicians, reporters, lawyers, and the lay public.

    Students are not expected to depart the course with fully developed advanced communication skills, as these skills evolve gradually over the course of a career. Instead, this course
    will provide students with a practical introduction to this topic as well as hands-on experience with disseminating research results at research conferences (i.e., giving oral presentations) and in peer-reviewed scientific journals (i.e., writing, editing, reviewing, and responding to criticism)
    (Cecil Jennings 2014)
  • Sampling and Analysis of Vertebrate Populations FW663 is designed to include a balance of science philosophy, statistical theory and biological application. While the overall theme of the course deals with model-based sampling and analysis theory for biological populations, the course is broad, providing the advanced student with the following:
    1) Some philosophy of inductive inference (e.g., estimation of parameters and measures of precision).
    2) A critical attitude concerning "results" and "findings" and an appreciation of the importance of underlying assumptions.
    3) State-of-the-science information on model-based sampling, analysis, and inference theory for populations in terrestrial and aquatic environments.
    4) Practical experience in sample design, analysis and inference in several experimental situations.
    5) Current publications useful for future reference.
    6) Familiarity with computer software for the sophisticated exploration of complex biological problems.


    (Bill Kendall 2014)
  • Wetland Wildlife This course provides students with a system-based understanding of wetlands and wetland wildlife management in Louisiana. (Sammy King 2014)
  • Analysis of Populations The class will focus on analyzing mark-recapture data to determine population size, survival, occupancy, dispersal, recruitment, site fidelity, cost of breeding, nest success, etc. We will be using Program MARK for computation. The first part of the class will be on estimating survival using Cormack-Jolly-Seber with emphasis on model selection, checking goodness of fit, and linear models. The topics for the remainder of the class will depend on student interest and needs. The class will use small data sets to understand and practice the determination of vital rates from the different models for mark-recapture. (Bob Klaver 2014)
  • Conservation by Proxy Reading and Discussing Tim Caro's book Conservation by Proxy (Bob Klaver 2014)
  • Proposal/Grant Writing The seminar is intended to familiarize students with the approaches and techniques used to prepare a proposal/grant. Each student will write a proposal during the seminar as well as critique proposals of other students in the seminar. (David Krementz 2014)
  • Wildlife Management Techniques The class is intended to familiarize students with techniques used in the management of wildlife populations. Students will be exposed to data collection and analysis, investigatory techniques, and wildlife and habitat management techniques. a semester-long class project will be conducted. (David Krementz 2014)
  • Management of Small Impoundments (Thomas Kwak, Jesse Fischer 2014)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2014)
  • Integration of remote sensing and GIS in natural resources management (Cyndy Loftin 2014)
  • Social Dimensions in Aquatic Ecology (Jim Long 2014)
  • Biometry: Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists (Dan Magoulick 2014)
  • Professional Skills (Martha Mather 2014)
  • Aquatic Toxicology This course will have an emphasis on the types of toxicity testing, the environmental fate of chemicals and the types of assessment needed. This class will emphasize fish toxicity. Students will learn about different types of toxicity testing including acute, early life stage, chronic, freshwater, and seawater. The environmental fate of contaminants involving transport and transformation processes, bioaccumulation, bioavailability, biochemical mechanism, fate modeling will also be discussed. Functional endpoints of ecosystem effects, federal regulation and ecological risk assessments as they relate to toxicological assessments are also emphasized. (Pat Mazik 2014)
  • Introduction to Structured Decision Making Introduction to Structured Decision Making (Conor McGowan 2014)
  • Research Design in the Biological Sciences (Dave McGuire 2014)
  • Research Design in the Biological Sciences (Dave McGuire 2014)
  • Management of Impounded River Basins (Leandro Miranda 2014)
  • Decision making in natural resources The course covers fundamentals and application of principles of structured decision making and adaptive management. (Mike Mitchell 2014)
  • Human dimensions of Wildlife Conservation This course is taught at Universidad Andres bello in Santiago Chile to Ph.D. students in Conservation Medicine. The course covers theory, methods, and case studies of human dimensions. (John Organ 2014)
  • Aquatic Ecology and Watershed Sciences Seminar Organized the discussion topic and ran the discussion meetings. The topic was on reviewing papers for journals and how to prepare manuscripts for publication (Donna Parrish 2014)
  • Animal Ecophysiology/Advanced Animal Ecophysiology (Reynaldo Patiño 2014)
  • Advanded Fisheries Science (Craig Paukert 2014)
  • Missouri's Aquatic Life This was a seminar series held for the University of Missouri's Extention Program's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. It covered Missouri's aquatic life, with 4 classes, covering Mussels, Crayfish, Fish, and Waterbirds. I organized guest lectures and after-class activities. (Amanda Rosenberger, Craig Paukert, Lisa Webb 2014)
  • An introduction to data management and R for Fisheries and Wildlife applications Includes lectures and interactive computer exercises. We attempt to employ an interactive classroom environment to explore the tools researchers and managers use to create, manipulate, and analyze datasets with R software. The beginning of the course consists of an introduction to the R environment with emphasis on the importance of creating a database that is functional, error free, and easily analyzed. We then focus on using R software to manipulate datasets and conduct analyses. (Jim Peterson, Michael Colvin 2014)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Jim Peterson, Michael Colvin 2014)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Lab) (Jim Peterson, Michael Colvin 2014)
  • Quantitative Fishery Assessment (Kevin Pope 2014)
  • Animal Migration A survey of literature on migration ecology ranging from theory to applied issues of animal migration for a range of taxa (fish, insects, birds, mammals). Topics covered will include understanding the mechanisms of migration, migratory connectivity and seasonal interactions, evolutionary theory, animal behavior, and conservation/management. The goals of the course are to a) gain background knowledge and perspective about animal migration, and b) develop critical reading and analysis skills. Both goals will be met by reading, presenting, and discussing classic and modern literature on animal migration.
    (Abby Powell 2014)
  • Advanced Fisheries Techniques (Michael Quist 2014)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Michael Quist 2014)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2014)
  • Stream Ecology Ecological principles applied to flowing waters, with emphasis on ecological processes within algal, invertebrate, and fish communities. The influence of geomorphic processes, hydrologic principles, and physical-chemical factors on the biota. (Amanda Rosenberger 2014)
  • Aquatic Ecology (Allison Roy 2014)
  • Ornithology The biology of birds, including evolution, functional morphology, physiology, ecology and behavior. Field and museum laboratories emphasize particular aspects of morphology, ecology and behavior, as well as taxonomy and identification. One coastal weekend field trip required. The goal of this course is building a foundation of knowledge about birds in a way that will stimulate students to keep learning about birds for the rest of their lives. Our approach will be to focus primarily on the behavior and ecology of birds and the development of field skills. Lectures amplify material from the text Ornithology, Third Edition, by Frank B. Gill as well as outside readings and examples from the instructors' personal research.
    (Ted Simons 2014)
  • Behavioral Ecology This course will introduce students to primary topics in the behavioral ecology of animals as a means to improve their understanding of basic and evolutionary ecology. (Joshua Stafford 2014)
  • Quantitative Methods in Ecology (Tyler Wagner 2014)
  • Applied Spatial Ecology Methods for managing and analyzing ecological datasets are constantly evolving. Advances in technology have resulted in large spatial datasets for aquatic and terrestrial populations that requires data compilation and analysis for making sound resource management and conservation decisions. From traditional estimators of home range and resource selection in R to spatial epidemiology of disease in WinBUGS, this course will provide hands-on learning for manipulation and analyses of ecological datasets for a variety of taxa. You will develop skills in understanding and processing complex datasets while learning traditional and innovative methods for spatial data analysis. (W. David Walter 2014)
  • Advanced Topics in Stream Ecology (Annika Walters 2014)
  • Wetland Ecology and Management This class will provide an introduction to wetland ecological principles, communities, processes, and functions, and their application toward conservation and management of wetlands and wetland dependent organisms. The objectives of this course are to help students increase their understanding of wetland ecosystems, as well as the tools and techniques used to manage wetlands, and enable them to apply this understanding in future wetland research, conservation and management. (Lisa Webb 2014)
  • Waterfowl Ecology and Management Ecology and management of North American waterfowl and their habitats. Laboratory exercises will focus on identification, life histories, sex and age determination, and survey methods. Lectures and discussions will cover taxonomy, ecology, behavior, population dynamics, harvest management, and habitat management and conservation. (Lisa Webb 2014)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2014)
  • Climate Change Seminar Covers major topics on climate change (Mark Wipfli 2014)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2014)
  • Movements and Migrations (Joseph Zydlewski 2014)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (Clint Boal, 2013)
  • Biopolitics: Communication in the Natural Resources (Scott Bonar 2013)
  • Scientific Writing for Publication (Shannon Brewer 2013)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation (Phaedra Budy 2013)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation Laboratory (Phaedra Budy 2013)
  • Wildlife-habitat Relationships (James Cain 2013)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Ecology (Courtney Conway 2013)
  • Conservation Genetics Covers the basic principles of genetics and genomics as relevant to fish and wildlife management and conservation. Includes topics on evolution, population genetic processes, and topics of interest to managers such as forensics and invasive species. (Melanie Culver 2013)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics Seminar course required for all students with a major or minor in Genetics, and all other interested students. Students present their research, we discuss current journal papers, and we have invited speakers. (Melanie Culver 2013)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics Seminar course required for all students with a major or minor in Genetics, and all other interested students. Students present their research, we discuss current journal papers, and we have invited speakers. (Melanie Culver 2013)
  • Conservation in Practice Human dimensions of wildlife and natural resources conservation, including lectures, discussions, and graduate student case studies. (Stephen DeStefano, John Organ 2013)
  • Advances in Ecology (Duane Diefenbach 2013)
  • Analysis of Animal Populations This course is designed to teach students quantitative methods for estimating vital rates and demographic parameters of animal populations (i.e., survival, abundance, occupancy). Emphasis is on vertebrate animals and statistical methods of hypothesis testing, parameter estimation, and inference testing. This course is offered odd-numbered years. (Katie Dugger 2013)
  • Estimating patterns and processes of animal occupancy. Teaches students how to estimate occupancy rates and the processes resulting in paterns of occupancy (extinction and colonization) using Program MARK. (Katie Dugger 2013)
  • Stream Fish Community Ecology (Jeff Falke 2013)
  • Adaptive Natural Resource Management (Joseph Fontaine 2013)
  • Field Ichthyology Distribution, life-history, and habitat associations of Texas freshwater, estuarine, and marine fishes. Field identification and collection methods emphasized. Field trips required. (Tim Grabowski 2013)
  • Occupancy Analysis (Barry Grand 2014)
  • Wildlife Conservation (Dave Haukos 2013)
  • Hierarchical Modeling in Ecology (Mevin Hooten 2013)
  • UGA WILD8360: Quantitative Conservation Science (Brian Irwin 2013)
  • Spatial ecology of seabirds Reading course focused on collection, analysis, and interpretation of spatial data for nearshore and pelagic seabirds (Patrick Jodice 2013)
  • Foundations of Ecology This course is designed to provide graduate students with a strong base in the foundational concepts in the field of ecology. The class will consist of an overview of classic papers in ecology, with particular emphasis on animal ecology. Students will read and discuss classic papers as well as current issues and theoretical advances.

    Course Learning Outcomes: Students will develop the ability to read, critique, discuss, and present ideas from scientific papers. Much of the class will focus on the development of critical thinking skills. Students also will develop skills in literature searching and scientific writing. Successful completion of the class will enhance the student’s ability to relate the science of ecology to natural resource management and conservation.
    (Patrick Jodice 2013)
  • Restoration and Management of Wetland Functions (Sammy King 2013)
  • Analysis of Resource Selection (Bob Klaver 2013)
  • Extended Field Trip - Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Bob Klaver 2013)
  • Wetlands Ecology and Management Ecology and management of wetlands with a focus on inland freshwater wetlands. Emphasis will be placed on management of wetlands for birds. (David Krementz 2013)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2013)
  • Fish Physiology and Condition The seminar is set-up such that students will work through a set of literature related to fish physiology and growth, leading up to readings and discussions related to commonly used as well as novel techniques to assess the condition of fish under different conditions. The course is set up with two-week units where students will explore literature within each unit, generating a literature summary and comprehensive literature list related to each topic. The final two weeks will be used to integrate all of the information, and to combine the unit literature summaries into one large literature review. (Megan La Peyre 2013)
  • Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems in natural resources management (Cyndy Loftin 2013)
  • Conservation Biology (Dan Magoulick 2013)
  • Professional Skills Graduate class that covers basic professional skills including proposal writing, oral presentations, posters, and networking. (Martha Mather 2013)
  • Fish Physiology Course covers the physiological systems of fish (ie nervous, reproductive, endocrine systems) (Pat Mazik 2013)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management Learning the tools and concepts of structure decision making as applied to natural resource management. The course is comprised of lectures, lab exercises, and an applied capstone type class project. (Conor McGowan 2013)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Leandro Miranda 2013)
  • Bayesian Modeling for Conservation Science The objectives of this course are to develop a basic understanding of and appreciation for Bayesian principles for the solution of problems in natural resources science; to gain practical experience in constructing, evaluating, and interpreting models under the Bayesian framework; and to explore classes of models useful for conservation science. (Clinton Moore 2013)
  • Advanced Animal Ecophysiology This course is designed for graduate students interested in vertebrate physiology and relationships with the environment; physiological adaptation; comparative physiology; aquatic toxicology; and conservation biology. Students are expected to have had a basic course in biological sciences as a prerequisite. Graduate students enrolled in NRM 6003 will need to complete a twenty minute presentation on a selected topic in Ecophysiology. (Reynaldo Patiño 2013)
  • Animal Ecophysiology This course is designed for undergraduate students interested in vertebrate physiology and relationships with the environment; physiological adaptation; comparative physiology; aquatic toxicology; and conservation biology. Students are expected to have had a basic course in biological sciences as a prerequisite. (Reynaldo Patiño 2013)
  • An introduction to data management and R for Fisheries and Wildlife applications Includes lectures and interactive computer exercises. We attempt to employ an interactive classroom environment to explore the tools researchers and managers use to create, manipulate, and analyze datasets with R software. The beginning of the course consists of an introduction to the R environment with emphasis on the importance of creating a database that is functional, error free, and easily analyzed. We then focus on using R software to manipulate datasets and conduct analyses. (Jim Peterson, Michael Colvin 2013)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2013)
  • Fisheries Science (Clay Pierce 2013)
  • Managed Aquatic Systems (Kevin Pope, Mark Pegg 2013)
  • Scientific Writing, Editing, and Revising in the Biological Sciences (Abby Powell 2013)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Michael Quist 2013)
  • Ecological Thresholds (Michael Quist 2013)
  • Physiological Ecology of Wildlife This course investigated the physiological ecology of wildlife. (Daniel Roby 2013)
  • Research Concepts (Allison Roy 2013)
  • Wildlife Research Design This course will provide students with exposure to the philosophy of science and critical thinking, important foundational work regarding wildlife study design and implementation, and an understanding of basic statistical tools and techniques that may be useful in their own research. (Joshua Stafford 2013)
  • Applied Spatial Ecology Methods for managing and analyzing ecological datasets are constantly evolving. Advances in technology have resulted in large spatial datasets for aquatic and terrestrial populations that requires data compilation and analysis for making sound resource management and conservation decisions. From traditional estimators of home range and resource selection in R to spatial epidemiology of disease in WinBUGS, this course will provide hands-on learning for manipulation and analyses of ecological datasets for a variety of taxa. You will develop skills in understanding and processing complex datasets while learning traditional and innovative methods for spatial data analysis. (W. David Walter 2013)
  • Advanced Fisheries Management (Annika Walters 2013)
  • Directed Undergraduate Research (Lisa Webb 2013)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2013)
  • Evolutionary Concepts in Conservation (Dana Winkelman 2013)
  • Population Dynamics (Dana Winkelman 2013)
  • Aquatic Entomology Ecology and taxonomy of aquatic insects, with discussions on food webs. (Mark Wipfli 2013)
  • Climate Change Seminar Various seminar topics on climate change. (Mark Wipfli 2013)
  • Conservation Biology (Petra Wood, Kyle Aldinger 2013)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2013)
  • WLE 650 Graduate Seminar - Movements and Migrations (Joseph Zydlewski 2013)
  • WLE 650 Graduate Seminar – Fish Physiology (Joseph Zydlewski 2013)
  • Behavioral Ecology (Alan Afton 2012)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (Clint Boal 2012)
  • Raptor Ecology and Conservation Overview of raptor diversity in NA, detailed examination of biology and ecology, overview of research techniques and methods, discussion of contemporary issues. (Clint Boal 2012)
  • Fisheries Management (Scott Bonar 2012)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation (Phaedra Budy 2012)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation Laboratory (Phaedra Budy 2012)
  • Large Mammal Ecology, Management, and Conservation This course will cover aspects large mammal ecology, management and conservation.
    The goal of the course is not to provide an in depth analysis or discussion of all lines of
    scientific inquiry into the ecology of large mammals, but rather to introduce students to
    some of the major topics of research in large mammal ecology, particularly those with
    relevance to management and conservation. During this course we will discuss aspects
    of foraging ecology, resource and habitat selection, competition and resource
    partitioning, predation and population dynamics.
    (James Cain 2012)
  • Enivornmental Biology of Fishes (Colleen Caldwell 2012)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2012)
  • Aquatic Trophic Ecology (Steven Chipps 2012)
  • Recent Advances in Genetics Seminar course required for all students with a major or minor in Genetics, and all other interested students. Students present their research, we discuss current journal papers, and we have invited speakers. (Melanie Culver 2012)
  • Research Concepts (Allison Roy, Stephen DeStefano 2012)
  • Advances in Ecology Introduction to Current Topics of Research in Ecology (Duane Diefenbach 2012)
  • Structured Decision Making and Adaptive Management of Natural Resources Introduction to Structured Decison Making and Adaptive Management. (Duane Diefenbach, Tyler Wagner 2012)
  • Wildlife Management Undergraduate capstone course for wildlife majors that covers the application of ecological concepts to making wildlife management decisions. (Duane Diefenbach 2012)
  • Principles of Modeling with Spreadsheets / Population Dynamics Students will be introduced to a variety of modeling techniques applicable to resouce management and conservation issues. Modeling topics include population models, decision analysis, and ecosystem models. This course was developed in collaboration between the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, National Training Center, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Conservation Training Center, and the Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Students include graduate students plus professional scientists from both federal and state agencies. (Terri Donovan 2012)
  • Estimating patterns and processes of animal occupancy. Teaches students how to estimate occupancy rates and the processes resulting in paterns of occupancy (extinction and colonization) using Program MARK. (Katie Dugger 2012)
  • Science Writing Graduate course on the process and technique of effective writing (Joseph Fontaine 2012)
  • Writing for Publication Postdoctoral course on the fundamentals of successful science writing (Joseph Fontaine 2012)
  • Structured Decision Making for Natural Resource Management (Angela Fuller 2012)
  • Human Dimensions of Wildlife Graduate course focus on the human dimensions of conservation in the context of management agency planning and decision-making. We incorporating principles of SDM/ADM in the course context. (David Fulton 2012)
  • Advanced Human Dimensions This course is designed to provide students aspiring to work in fisheries and wildlife or other natural resource management fields, whether at the federal, state, or local level of government or an NGO, with a basic level of understanding of the social aspects of management and some practical applied human dimensions skills.
    Course Objectives
    1. Understand the history and evolution of human dimensions research and application in management (paradigm model).

    2. Be able to define human dimensions and public involvement and why these are important to wildlife management.

    3. Be familiar with major concepts and theories applied in human dimensions.
    4. Be familiar with research tools used in human dimensions.
    (Larry Gigliotti 2012)
  • Field Ichthyology Distribution, life-history, and habitat associations of Texas freshwater, estuarine, and marine fishes. Field identification and collection methods emphasized. Field trips required. (Tim Grabowski 2012)
  • Foraging Ecology Introduces students to the theory and test of theory in foraging ecology through critical reading of original literature and discussion. (Brad Griffith 2012)
  • Professional Opportunities in Natural Resources Introduced students to professional employment opportunities in natural resources through a series of invited speakers and special sessions on resume preparation, application strategies, and oral interview preparation. (Brad Griffith 2012)
  • Communication in Ecological Sciences (Christopher Guy 2012)
  • Fisheries Science (Christopher Guy 2012)
  • Advanced Spatial Modeling Special Topics course in Division of Biology, KSU. Material will include a variety of analyses of spatial data gathered from GIS and remote sensing. (Dave Haukos, Eugene Albanese 2012)
  • Wildlife Conservation Introduction to wildlife, fisheries, and conservation biology. Core course for Wildlife, FIsheries, and Conservation Biology and Wildlife and Outdoor Enterprise Management majors at Kansas State University. Team taught in Division of Biology (Dave Haukos 2012)
  • Quantitative Fisheries Management (Joseph Hightower 2012)
  • UGA WILD8980: Introduction to Quantitative Conservation Science (Brian Irwin 2012)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resource Professionals To help young scientists develop an advanced understanding of and appreciation for the components of effective written and oral scientific communication with a diverse group of
    constituents, including peers, supervisors, administrators, politicians, reporters, lawyers, and the lay public.

    Students are not expected to depart the course with fully developed advanced communication skills, as these skills evolve gradually over the course of a career. Instead, this course
    will provide students with a practical introduction to this topic as well as hands-on experience with disseminating research results at research conferences (i.e., giving oral presentations) and in peer-reviewed scientific journals (i.e., writing, editing, reviewing, and responding to criticism)
    (Cecil Jennings 2012)
  • Wetland and Wildlife Ecology (Sammy King 2012)
  • Wetlands of the Upper Midwest (Sammy King 2012)
  • Wildlife Management Techniques To familiarize students with techniques used in the management of wildlife populations. The course will be composed of lectures and laboratory exercises. (David Krementz 2012)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2012)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resources, or, How to make good decisions The seminar is set-up such that students will work through the SDM process during the semester as we discuss different steps in the SDM process. We will alternate weeks where we will present and discuss the SDM process, with weeks where groups will present their progress on a semester long management project. (Megan La Peyre, Bryan Piazza 2012)
  • Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems in natural resources management (Cyndy Loftin 2012)
  • Social Dimensions in Aquatic Ecology (Jim Long 2012)
  • Biometry: Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists (Dan Magoulick 2012)
  • Professional Skills (Martha Mather 2012)
  • River Regimes (Martha Mather 2012)
  • Aquatic Toxicology This course will have an emphasis on the types of toxicity testing, the environmental fate of chemicals and the types of assessment needed. This class will emphasize fish toxicity. Students will learn about different types of toxicity testing including acute, early life stage, chronic, freshwater, and seawater. The environmental fate of contaminants involving transport and transformation processes, bioaccumulation, bioavailability, biochemical mechanism, fate modeling will also be discussed. Functional endpoints of ecosystem effects, federal regulation and ecological risk assessments as they relate to toxicological assessments are also emphasized. (Pat Mazik 2012)
  • Problem Solving in Wildlife Science (Conor McGowan 2012)
  • Interdisciplinary Modeling of High Latitude Global Change (Dave McGuire 2012)
  • Research Design in the Biological Sciences (Dave McGuire 2012)
  • Management of Impounded River Basins (Leandro Miranda 2012)
  • Ecology of Fishes (Donna Parrish 2012)
  • Graduate Student Seminar-On Becoming a Successful Scientist (Donna Parrish 2012)
  • Advanded Fisheries Science (Craig Paukert 2012)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Jim Peterson, Michael Colvin 2012)
  • Quantitative Decision Analysis For Fish and Wildlife Management (Jim Peterson 2012)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management (Jim Peterson 2012)
  • Quantitative Fishery Assessment (Kevin Pope 2012)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Michael Quist 2012)
  • Advanced Fisheries Techniques (Michael Quist 2012)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Carl Schreck 2012)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 2012)
  • The Beak of the Finch (Joshua Stafford 2012)
  • Quantitative Methods in Ecology (Tyler Wagner 2012)
  • Ecological effects of climate change (Annika Walters, 2012)
  • Wetland Ecology and Management (Lisa Webb 2012)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2012)
  • Climate Change Seminar Covers a wide range of climate change topics. (Mark Wipfli 2012)
  • Coastal Ecosytems (Mark Wipfli 2012)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2012)
  • Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management (Alexander Zale 2012)
  • WLE 490 Special Projects in Fisheries (Joseph Zydlewski 2012)
  • WLE 591 Movements and Migrations (Joseph Zydlewski 2012)
  • Behavioral Ecology (Alan Afton 2011)
  • Advanced Topics in Renewable Natural Resources (Alan Afton 2011)
  • Constructing Sustainability (Paul Angermeier 2011)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (Clint Boal 2011)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resources Conservation (Clint Boal 2011)
  • Biopolitics: Communication in the Natural Resources (Scott Bonar 2011)
  • Stream Ecology (Shannon Brewer 2011)
  • Wildlife-habitat Relationships (James Cain 2011)
  • Aquatic Contaminants and Toxicology (Colleen Caldwell 2011)
  • Research in Ecology (Anna Chalfoun 2011)
  • Conservation Genetics Covers the basic principles of genetics and genomics as relevant to fish and wildlife management and conservation. Includes topics on evolution, population genetic processes, and topics of interest to managers such as forensics and invasive species. (Melanie Culver 2011)
  • Research Concepts Course covers the history and philosophy of science, setting up research questions and hypotheses, basic research concepts and study design, and proposal development, writing, and presentation. (Stephen DeStefano 2011)
  • Wildlife Conservation and Management This course is taught at Universidad Andres Bello in Santiago, Chile to Ph.D. students in Conservation Medicine. The course covers principles and techniques of wildlife conservation. (John Organ, Stephen DeStefano 2011)
  • Population Estimation and Modeling (Duane Diefenbach 2011)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2011)
  • Wildlife Behavior This course is designed to provide a general background on the adaptive significance of wildlife behavior, while increasing the understanding of how behavior affects basic inter-relationships between wildlife and their environments. The important of understanding animal behavior in teh context of sound wildlife management will also be explored. (Katie Dugger 2011)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2011)
  • Wildlife Behavior This course is designed to provide a general background on the adaptive significance of wildlife behavior, while increasing the understanding of how behavior affects basic inter-relationships between wildlife and their environments. The important of understanding animal behavior in teh context of sound wildlife management will also be explored. (Katie Dugger 2011)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2011)
  • baseR for Biologists (Thomas Edwards 2011)
  • Occupancy Modeling Graduate course on theory and techniques in occupancy modeling (Joseph Fontaine 2011)
  • Structured Decision Making for Natural Resource Management This graduate seminar will provide an introduction to the principles and practice of structured decision making and its application in natural resource management. Students will become familiar with methods for finding optimal solutions to decision problems, and will apply these methods to natural resource problems.
    Students will become familiar with the application of quantitative decision modeling tools: single and multiple-objective trade-off techniques, decision trees, Bayesian belief and decision networks, linear programming, and optimization.
    (Angela Fuller 2011)
  • Fisheries Ecology: Management and Conservation of Marine Resources in a Changing Ocean In order to reliably define the conditions under which fisheries can sustainably operate in the long-term, it is essential to have a thorough understanding of the influence of human activities and ocean climate on the ecology of the stocks in question. Climatic variation has been shown to affect behaviour and distribution of marine organisms. Changes in all of our major fish stocks have occurred in recent decades due to trends in ocean climate. Commercial fishing has also altered those which are exploited, at both the inter- and intra-stock levels. Most often, mortality imposed by fishing is considerably higher than that which occurs naturally. In addition, fishing is inherently selective. Accumulating evidence indicates that fishing has influenced the phenotypic and genetic structure, production, sustainability and recovery potential of harvested stocks.

    This course will focus on the ecology of exploited marine fish resources, with particular emphasis on the effects that ocean climate and human activities have on the physiology, biology and behaviour of fish populations.
    (Tim Grabowski 2011)
  • Intro to GIS (Barry Grand 2011)
  • Use of focal species for coservation planning (Barry Grand 2011)
  • Scientific Communication in a Digital World (Ted Simons, Joseph Hightower 2011)
  • Bayesian Analysis of Ecological Models and Data (Mevin Hooten 2011)
  • Hierarchical Modeling in Ecology (Mevin Hooten 2011)
  • Readings in Ecology Current reading in ecology (Patrick Jodice 2011)
  • Foundations of Ecology (Patrick Jodice 2011)
  • Restoration and Management of Wetland Functions (Sammy King 2011)
  • Wetlands of the Middle Rio Grande Field-based course to study the ecology, management, and conservation of wetlands within the upper and middle Rio Grande (Sammy King 2011)
  • Floodplain Ecology (Sammy King 2011)
  • Habitat use and selection This seminar will introduce students to the concepts behind, analysis of and interpretation of habitat use and selection studies. (David Krementz 2011)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2011)
  • Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems in natural resources management (Cyndy Loftin 2011)
  • Fish Ecology (Dan Magoulick 2011)
  • Conducting strong inference science Training graduate students how to identify gaps in knowledge and application of hypothetico-deductive approaches to their thesis research. (Thomas Martin 2011)
  • Professional Skills (Martha Mather 2011)
  • Fish Physiology (Pat Mazik 2011)
  • Structured Decision Making for Natural Resource Management A graduate seminar on the principles and some of the techniques for structured decision making. (Conor McGowan 2011)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Leandro Miranda 2011)
  • Aquatic Ecology and Watershed Science Seminar The purpose of the AEWS seminar is to provide an opportunity for the AEWS community to interact, share emerging research results, get feedback on proposed experimental plans, discuss recent papers of interest to the group, and learn about related research from outside speakers and collaborators. Graduate students in the AEWS concentration are required to take this seminar for credit (1 cr) once during their tenure in the graduate program, ideally in the semester in which they are planning their field research. However, the entire AEWS community and colleagues who are interested in AEWS research are strongly encouraged to join us each semester. (Donna Parrish 2011)
  • Advanced Animal Ecophysiology This course is designed for graduate students interested in vertebrate physiology and relationships with the environment; physiological adaptation; comparative physiology; aquatic toxicology; and conservation biology. Students are expected to have had a basic course in biological sciences as a prerequisite. Graduate students enrolled in NRM 6003 will need to complete a twenty minute presentation on a selected topic in Ecophysiology. (Reynaldo Patiño 2011)
  • Lotic Community Ecology (Craig Paukert, Allison Pease 2011)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2011)
  • Fisheries Science (Clay Pierce 2011)
  • Managed Aquatic Systems (Kevin Pope 2011)
  • Effects of Climate Change on Birds (Abby Powell 2011)
  • Scientific Writing, Editing, and Reviewing (Abby Powell 2011)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Michael Quist 2011)
  • Ecological Thresholds (Michael Quist 2011)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2011)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Carl Schreck 2011)
  • Quantitative Methods in Ecology (Tyler Wagner 2011)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2011)
  • Evolutionary Concepts in Conservation (Dana Winkelman 2011)
  • Population Dynamics (Dana Winkelman 2011)
  • Climate Change Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2011)
  • Aquatic Entomology (Mark Wipfli 2011)
  • Conservation Biology (Petra Wood 2011)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2011)
  • Ecology of Biological Invasions (Craig Allen 2010)
  • Constructing Sustainability (Paul Angermeier 2010)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (Clint Boal 2010)
  • Tropical Avian Ecology Introduction to field ornithology in tropical locations. Taught concurrently with a course in Tropical Conservation Biology. (Clint Boal 2010)
  • Fisheries Management Lecture and laboratory course on fisheries management (Scott Bonar 2010)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation (Phaedra Budy 2010)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation Laboratory (Phaedra Budy 2010)
  • Field Methods for Wildlife and Conservation (James Cain 2010)
  • Quantitative Biology (James Cain 2010)
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes (Colleen Caldwell 2010)
  • Recent Advances in Habitat Ecology (Anna Chalfoun, 2010)
  • Research in Ecology (Anna Chalfoun 2010)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates This course covers the phylogeny, life-history, habitats and ecology of major freshwater invertebrates. The use of invertebrate taxa as biomonitoring criteria and impacts from exotic/invasive species are also covered. (Steven Chipps 2010)
  • Aquatic Trophic Ecology (Steven Chipps 2010)
  • Conservation Design for Manatee in Puerto Rico This is a participatory research course, which means that (1) we do not know the answer to the questions being posed and (2) we will work together to design and carry out research to answer the question. The assignment for this course is: To document and deliver the science to inform a federal ruling regarding the establishment of manatee protection area(s) in Puerto Rico (*link to federal article*) (Jaime Collazo, Ashton Drew 2010)
  • Conservation Genetics Covers the basic principles of genetics and genomics as relevant to fish and wildlife management and conservation. Includes topics on evolution, population genetic processes, and topics of interest to managers such as forensics and invasive species. (Melanie Culver 2010)
  • Conservation Biology Seminar on a variety of topics related to the many aspects of conservation biology including ecology, genetics, history of, social science, economics, and more. Discussions center around current peer-reviewed literature. (Melanie Culver 2010)
  • Research Concepts Introduction to the research process in the natural resources and environmental conservation sciences. Course will focus on research philosophy, concepts, and design, but will progress through the entire research cycle, from development of hypotheses, questions, and proposals, to grants and budgeting, to delivery of research products. This course also serves as an orientation to your department and your graduate program, and an introduction to your fellow graduate students in the Department of Environmental Conservation. (Stephen DeStefano 2010)
  • Introduction to Occupancy Modeling This course introduces students to modeling patterns of species distributions, especially when not all individuals can be detected by an observer. The course is an on-line course, co-instructed by Kurt Rinehart, Lew Coggins, and Terri Donovan. We'll be posting materials on a public website listed below as materials are finalized. (Terri Donovan 2010)
  • Principles of Modeling with Spreadsheets/Population Dynamics and Modeling This course introduces a variety of modeling techniques applicable to resouce management and conservation issues. Modeling topics include population models, decision analysis, spatial models, and ecosystem models. (Terri Donovan 2010)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2010)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2010)
  • Topics in Spatial Ecology (Thomas Edwards 2010)
  • Biodiversity (Joseph Fontaine 2010)
  • Adaptive Natural Resource Management (Joseph Fontaine 2010)
  • Ecology of Riparian Systems (Joseph Fontaine 2010)
  • Habitat Use, Selection, and Occupancy Training in the design and analysis of field studies on the relationships between animals’ distributions in space and habitat attributes. Specific topics will include sampling design, statistical analyses, interpretation, and assumptions/limitations. Course will emphasize model building and evaluation. (Barry Grand, Todd Steury 2010)
  • Foraging Ecology (Brad Griffith 2010)
  • Natural Resource Policy/Biopolitics Senior-Graduate course taught at Texas Tech University providing an overview of the roles of policy and biopolitics in management of natural resources. Taught for 6 years (Dave Haukos 2010)
  • Quantitative Fisheries Management (Joseph Hightower, Joshua Raabe 2010)
  • Bayesian Methods in Fisheries Science (Joseph Hightower 2010)
  • Management of Small Impoundments (Thomas Kwak, Joseph Hightower 2010)
  • MSU FW479: Fisheries Management (Brian Irwin 2010)
  • River Basin Management and Planning (Elise Irwin 2010)
  • Special Topics Lotic Ecology (Elise Irwin 2010)
  • Ecology and Management of Riverine Systems (Elise Irwin 2010)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resource Professionals To help young scientists develop an advanced understanding of and appreciation for the components of effective written and oral scientific communication with a diverse group of
    constituents, including peers, supervisors, administrators, politicians, reporters, lawyers, and the lay public.

    Students are not expected to depart the course with fully developed advanced communication skills, as these skills evolve gradually over the course of a career. Instead, this course
    will provide students with a practical introduction to this topic as well as hands-on experience with disseminating research results at research conferences (i.e., giving oral presentations) and in peer-reviewed scientific journals (i.e., writing, editing, reviewing, and responding to criticism)
    (Cecil Jennings 2010)
  • Wildlfie Energetics (Patrick Jodice 2010)
  • Wetland and Wildlife Ecology Introduction to wetland ecosystems including biotic and abiotic processes of wetlands and the basic ecology of wetland-dependent wildlife (Sammy King 2010)
  • Wildlife Management (David Krementz 2010)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2010)
  • Science, Advocacy, Communication and Environmental Policy This class will explore links between science, scientists, communication and environmental policy; and develop critical thinking to evaluate the ways that science and policy can be integrated. (Megan La Peyre 2010)
  • Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems in natural resources management (Cyndy Loftin 2010)
  • Introduction to Side Scan Sonar Interpretation Special problems course intended to provide hands-on instruction in the use and interpretation of side scan sonar imagery. (Jim Long 2010)
  • Aquatic Nuisance Species Management (Jim Long 2010)
  • Biometry: Experimental Design and Data Analysis (Dan Magoulick 2010)
  • Natural resource and environmental management: interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives (Martha Mather 2010)
  • Aquatic Toxicology This course will have an emphasis on the types of toxicity testing, the environmental fate of chemicals and the types of assessment needed. This class will emphasize fish toxicity. Students will learn about different types of toxicity testing including acute, early life stage, chronic, freshwater, and seawater. The environmental fate of contaminants involving transport and transformation processes, bioaccumulation, bioavailability, biochemical mechanism, fate modeling will also be discussed. Functional endpoints of ecosystem effects, federal regulation and ecological risk assessments as they relate to toxicological assessments are also emphasized. (Pat Mazik 2010)
  • Interdisciplinary Modeling of High Latitude Global Change (Dave McGuire 2010)
  • Management of Impounded River Basins (Leandro Miranda 2010)
  • Physiological Ecology of Aquatic Organisms (Reynaldo Patiño 2010)
  • Selected Topics in Fisheries Science/Advanced Topics in Biology Instructor teaches these courses every long semester. Both courses are taught concurrently to graduate students for whom he serves as primary advisor. Topics vary. (Reynaldo Patiño 2010)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2010)
  • Quantitative Fishery Assessment (Kevin Pope 2010)
  • Scientific Writing, Editing, and Reviewing (Abby Powell 2010)
  • Fisheries Techniques Fisheries Techniques: Split-level course (Michael Quist 2010)
  • Metapopulations and Other Advanced Topics (Christine Ribic 2010)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Carl Schreck 2010)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 2010)
  • Tropical Biology Course provides an introduction to the ecosystems of the New World tropics. Emphasis will be placed on ecology and natural history of Neotropical vertebrates. Examples of course topics include a survey of Neotropical biomes, origins of tropical biodiversity, animal-plant relationships, and natural resource conservation. (Francisco Vilella 2010)
  • Quantitative Methods in Ecology (Tyler Wagner 2010)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2010)
  • Modelling for Conservation (Stuart Welsh 2010)
  • Aquatic Entomology (Mark Wipfli 2010)
  • Climate Change Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2010)
  • Freshwater Ecosystems Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2010)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2010)
  • Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Managaement The goal of the course is to provide fisheries and wildlife management graduate students with an understanding of how social, cultural, behavioral, and demographic characteristics of humans affect fisheries and wildlife management. (Alexander Zale 2010)
  • Quantitative Freshwater Fisheries (Joseph Zydlewski 2010)
  • Foundations of Resilience (Craig Allen 2009)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (co-taught with Gad Perry) (Clint Boal 2009)
  • Raptor Ecology and Conservation (Clint Boal 2009)
  • Biopolitics (Scott Bonar 2009)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation (Phaedra Budy 2009)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation Lab (Phaedra Budy 2009)
  • Graduate Quantitative Biology (James Cain 2009)
  • Geospatial Mapping (James Cain 2009)
  • Quantitative Biology (James Cain 2009)
  • Quantitative Biology (James Cain 2009)
  • Wildlife-habitat Relationships (James Cain 2009)
  • Aquatic Contaminants and Toxicology (Colleen Caldwell 2009)
  • Special Topics in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (Raymond Carthy 2009)
  • Seminal Concepts in Conservation Biology (Anna Chalfoun 2009)
  • Writing in Biological Sciences (Anna Chalfoun 2009)
  • Climate Change and Conservation (Jaime Collazo, Alexa McKerrow, 2009)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Ecology (Courtney Conway 2009)
  • Conservation Genetics (Melanie Culver 2009)
  • Research Concepts Introduction to the research process in the natural resources and environmental conservation sciences. Course will focus on research philosophy, concepts, and design, but will progress through the entire research cycle, from development of hypotheses, questions, and proposals, to grants and budgeting, to delivery of research products. This course also serves as an orientation to your department and your graduate program, and an introduction to your fellow graduate students in the Department of Natural Resources Conservation. (Stephen DeStefano 2009)
  • Integrated Conservation Monitoring (Terri Donovan 2009)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2009)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2009)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2009)
  • Human Dimensions of Fisheries Special short course for Minnesota DNR fisheries staff. (David Fulton 2009)
  • Fisheries Techniques (Christopher Guy 2009)
  • Modeling Fish and Wildlife Populations (Joseph Hightower 2009)
  • Foundations of Ecology (Patrick Jodice 2009)
  • Wildlife Habitat Analysis (Patrick Jodice 2009)
  • Restoration and Management of Wetland Functions (Sammy King 2009)
  • Wetlands of the Intermountain West (Sammy King 2009)
  • Population Analysis of Animals Using Mark-Recapture Techniques (Bob Klaver 2009)
  • Wetlands Ecology (David Krementz 2009)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2009)
  • Natural Resources Management (Megan La Peyre 2009)
  • Integration of remote sensing and GIS in natural resources management (Cyndy Loftin 2009)
  • Conducting strong inference science (Thomas Martin 2009)
  • Fish Physiology (Pat Mazik 2009)
  • Special Topics in IGERT Program in Regional Resilience and Adaptation (Dave McGuire 2009)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Leandro Miranda 2009)
  • Research Design (Mike Mitchell 2009)
  • Ecology of Fishes (Donna Parrish 2009)
  • Aquaculture (Reynaldo Patiño 2009)
  • Selected Topics in Fisheries Science/Advanced Topics in Biology Instructor teaches these courses every long semester. Both courses are taught concurrently to graduate students for whom he serves as primary advisor. Topics vary. (Reynaldo Patiño 2009)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2009)
  • Integrating Management, Monitoring and Research: Adaptive Resource Management for Animal Conservation (David Galat, Jim Peterson, Michael Conroy 2009)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2009)
  • Fisheries Science (Clay Pierce 2009)
  • Managed Aquatic Systems (Kevin Pope 2009)
  • Avian Ecology Discussion Group (Abby Powell 2009)
  • Current Issues in Conservation Biology (Abby Powell 2009)
  • Fish Biology Fish Biology, undergraduate course (Michael Quist 2009)
  • Applied Fish Ecology (Michael Quist 2009)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2009)
  • International Directed Study (Daniel Roby 2009)
  • 2009 International Course on Avian Movements and Migration Technology (Daniel Roby 2009)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Carl Schreck 2009)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Carl Schreck 2009)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 2009)
  • Conservation Biology Theories and paradigms of conservation biology. Principles of species-level evolutionary and biogeographic processes. Patterns of speciation, and extinction processes. Metapopulation dynamics, community-level processes and mechanisms of isolation and fragmentation. Management tools available to diagnose declines of populations and techniques for remediating losses of biodiversity. (Francisco Vilella 2009)
  • Quantitative Methods in Ecology (Tyler Wagner 2009)
  • Population Dynamics (Dana Winkelman 2009)
  • Global Change Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2009)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2009)
  • Movements and Migration (Joseph Zydlewski 2009)
  • Ecology of Biological Invasions (Craig Allen 2008)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (co-taught with Gad Perry) (Clint Boal 2008)
  • Advanced Nongame Ecology and Management (Clint Boal 2008)
  • Fisheries Management (Scott Bonar 2008)
  • Fisheries Management Lab (Scott Bonar 2008)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation (Phaedra Budy 2008)
  • Fish Diversity and Conservation Lab (Phaedra Budy 2008)
  • Quantitative Biology (James Cain 2008)
  • Wildlife Management I (James Cain 2008)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Colleen Caldwell 2008)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2008)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2008)
  • Aquatic Trophic Ecology (Steven Chipps 2008)
  • Topics in Species-Habitat Modeling (Seminar), Fall 2008 (Jaime Collazo 2008)
  • Conservation Biology (Melanie Culver 2008)
  • Conservation Biology Seminar on a variety of topics related to the many aspects of conservation biology including ecology, genetics, history of, social science, economics, and more. Discussions center around current peer-reviewed literature. (Melanie Culver 2008)
  • Analysis of Animal Location Data (Duane Diefenbach 2008)
  • Classic Ecology (Duane Diefenbach 2008)
  • Population Dynamics and Modeling (Terri Donovan 2008)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2008)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2008)
  • Wetlands and Riparian Ecology (Katie Dugger 2008)
  • Sustainable Land Use Planning (David Fulton 2008)
  • Marine Ecology Lectures, discussions, and laboratory exercises will be used to provide an interactive introduction to the ecology of the marine environment. Students will learn to apply general ecological concepts to specific marine ecosystems, with an emphasis on those of the North Atlantic. Topics include limitations of the physical environment, primary production, trophic dynamics and interactions, population dynamics and life history theory, and biogeography. Laboratory exercises will expose students to experimental design and analysis with an emphasis on communication with a scientific audience. (Tim Grabowski 2008)
  • Directed Study: Course Defisn (Barry Grand 2008)
  • Special Problem in Wildlife Science:MATLAB Programming (Barry Grand 2008)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Christopher Guy 2008)
  • Quantitative Fisheries Management (Julie Harris, Joseph Hightower 2008)
  • Management of Small Impoundments (Joseph Hightower, Thomas Kwak 2008)
  • MSU FW893: Conservation of Exploited Fish and Wildlife Populations (Brian Irwin 2008)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resource Professional To help young scientists develop an advanced understanding of and appreciation for the components of effective written and oral scientific communication with a diverse group of
    constituents, including peers, supervisors, administrators, politicians, reporters, lawyers, and the lay public.

    Students are not expected to depart the course with fully developed advanced communication skills, as these skills evolve gradually over the course of a career. Instead, this course
    will provide students with a practical introduction to this topic as well as hands-on experience with disseminating research results at research conferences (i.e., giving oral presentations) and in peer-reviewed scientific journals (i.e., writing, editing, reviewing, and responding to criticism)
    (Cecil Jennings 2008)
  • Wildlife Seminar -- Landscape Ecology (Sammy King 2008)
  • Analysis of Animal Populations (David Krementz 2008)
  • Wildlife Management (David Krementz 2008)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2008)
  • Natural Resources Policy (Megan La Peyre 2008)
  • Integration of GIS and remote sensing data in natural resources applications (Cyndy Loftin 2008)
  • Biometry (Dan Magoulick 2008)
  • Conducting strong inference science (Thomas Martin 2008)
  • Diadromous Fish (Martha Mather 2008)
  • Interpretation of Ecological Data (Martha Mather 2008)
  • Aquatic Toxicology (Pat Mazik 2008)
  • Interdisciplinary Modeling of High Latitude Global Change (Dave McGuire 2008)
  • Management of Impounded River Basins (Leandro Miranda 2008)
  • Research Design (Mike Mitchell 2008)
  • Select Topics in Fisheries Science/Biology (Reynaldo Patiño 2008)
  • Physiological Ecology of Aquatic Organisms (Reynaldo Patiño 2008)
  • Advanded Fisheries Science (Craig Paukert 2008)
  • Fisheries Management and Techniques (Craig Paukert 2008)
  • Biology and Ecology of Freshwater Mussels (Jim Peterson 2008)
  • Quantitative Fishery Assessment (Kevin Pope 2008)
  • Scientific Writing, Reviewing, and Editing (Abby Powell 2008)
  • Study Abroad Study abroad to South Korea (Michael Quist 2008)
  • Natural History of Iowa Vertebrates (Michael Quist 2008)
  • Metapopulations and other advanced topics (Christine Ribic 2008)
  • Physiological Ecology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2008)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Carl Schreck 2008)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Carl Schreck 2008)
  • Tropical Biology Seminar (Francisco Vilella 2008)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2008)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2008)
  • Aquatic Entomology (Mark Wipfli 2008)
  • Freshwater Ecosystems Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2008)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2008)
  • Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management (Alexander Zale 2008)
  • Quantitative Freshwater Fisheries (Joseph Zydlewski 2008)
  • Advanced Topics in Renewable Natural Resources (Alan Afton 2007)
  • Landscape Ecology (Craig Allen 2007)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (co-taught with Gad Perry) (Clint Boal 2007)
  • Biopolitics (Scott Bonar 2007)
  • Principles of Stream Restoration: Part I (Phaedra Budy 2007)
  • Populations and Resources Course covered population dynamics, demographic processes, behavioral ecology of resource use, predator-prey and plant-herbivore interactions, competition, parasites and pathogens, food chains and webs, metapopulation dynamics, and population viability analysis. (James Cain 2007)
  • Hierarchical Species-Habitat Analysis and Conservation (Jaime Collazo 2007)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Ecology (Courtney Conway 2007)
  • Conservation Biology Seminar on a variety of topics related to the many aspects of conservation biology including ecology, genetics, history of, social science, economics, and more. Discussions center around current peer-reviewed literature. (Melanie Culver 2007)
  • Conservation Genetics (Melanie Culver 2007)
  • Conservation Biology Seminar on a variety of topics related to the many aspects of conservation biology including ecology, genetics, history of, social science, economics, and more. Discussions center around current peer-reviewed literature. (Melanie Culver 2007)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2007)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2007)
  • Parameter Estimation in Population Ecology (Occupancy Modeling) (Terri Donovan 2007)
  • Endangered species, society, and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2007)
  • Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (David Fulton 2007)
  • Special topics: Social Science Research for Land Use Planning, (David Fulton 2007)
  • Fish Ecology Lectures and discussions will be used to provide an interactive exploration of the ecology of fishes. Topics include: foraging, reproduction, habitat selection, niche, competition, and the mechanisms controlling fish biodiversity. Instruction includes both the status of a topic and appropriate research designs. The latter materials will be relevant to most animal taxa. (Tim Grabowski 2007)
  • Analysis of Wildlife Populations (Barry Grand 2007)
  • Quantitative Conservation Biology (Barry Grand 2007)
  • Independent Study: National Assessment of State Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategies (Brad Griffith, Abby Powell 2007)
  • Foundations of Ecology (Patrick Jodice 2007)
  • Avian Nest Survival (Patrick Jodice 2007)
  • Readings in Habitat Ecology (Matthew Kauffman 2007)
  • Predator Functions (Matthew Kauffman 2007)
  • Issues in Ecology and Conservation (Sammy King 2007)
  • Restoration and Management of Wetlands (Sammy King 2007)
  • Seminar in Biology - Occupancy Rate Estimation (David Krementz 2007)
  • Management of Small Impoundments (Thomas Kwak 2007)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2007)
  • Integration of GIS and remote sensing data in natural resources applications (Cyndy Loftin 2007)
  • Fish Ecology (Dan Magoulick 2007)
  • Conducting strong inference science (Thomas Martin 2007)
  • Ecological Interactions of Fishes (Martha Mather 2007)
  • Resilience and Adaptation Program Ecology Module (Dave McGuire 2007)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Leandro Miranda 2007)
  • Graduate Research Seminar (Mike Mitchell 2007)
  • Aquaculture (Reynaldo Patiño 2007)
  • Select Topics in Fisheries Science/Biology (Reynaldo Patiño 2007)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2007)
  • Estimation of Parameters of Fish and Wildlife Populations (Jim Peterson, Michael Conroy, Jon Runge 2007)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2007)
  • Fisheries Science (Clay Pierce 2007)
  • Managed Aquatic Systems (Kevin Pope 2007)
  • Scientific Writing and Editing (Abby Powell 2007)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2007)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 2007)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2007)
  • Quantitative Ecology (Stuart Welsh 2007)
  • Population Dynamics (Dana Winkelman 2007)
  • Riverine Ecosystems, Special Topics (Mark Wipfli 2007)
  • Freshwater Ecosystems Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2007)
  • Conservation Biology (Petra Wood 2007)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2007)
  • Seminar (Joseph Zydlewski 2007)
  • Behavioral Ecology (Alan Afton 2006)
  • Ecology of Biological Invasions (Craig Allen 2006)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (co-taught with Gad Perry) (Clint Boal 2006)
  • Problems: Tropical avian ecology (Clint Boal 2006)
  • Select Topics in Wildlife Science (Clint Boal 2006)
  • Nongame Ecology and Management (Clint Boal 2006)
  • Advanced Inland Fisheries Management (Scott Bonar 2005)
  • Population Ecology (Phaedra Budy 2006)
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes (Colleen Caldwell 2006)
  • Wildlife Habitat Conservation & Management (Anna Chalfoun 2006)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2006)
  • Aquatic Trophic Ecology (Steven Chipps 2006)
  • Conservation Biology Seminar on a variety of topics related to the many aspects of conservation biology including ecology, genetics, history of, social science, economics, and more. Discussions center around current peer-reviewed literature. (Melanie Culver 2006)
  • Conservation Genetics (Melanie Culver 2006)
  • Analysis of Animal Location Data (Duane Diefenbach 2006)
  • Population Dynamics and Modeling (Terri Donovan 2006)
  • Endangered species, society and sustainability This course provides a general background in basic endangered species biology and ecology and also explores the social and economic implications of the legislation enacted to conserve endangered species (i.e., The Endangered Species Act). (Katie Dugger 2006)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2006)
  • Topics in Spatial Ecology (Thomas Edwards 2006)
  • Topics in Spatial Ecology (Thomas Edwards 2006)
  • Conservation Psychology (David Fulton 2006)
  • Fish Physiology Basic fish physiology with an emphasis on the effects of environmental stresses on physiological functions of fish. Lectures focus on how the physiological systems in fishes have evolved in response to the daunting challenges of life in an aquatic environment. A comparative approach examining the different solutions various taxa have developed to meet these challenges is presented. (Tim Grabowski 2006)
  • Occupancy Estimation and Modeling (Barry Grand 2006)
  • Special Problem in Wildlife Science:Analysis of Live/Dead Recapture/Recovery Data (Barry Grand 2006)
  • Research Design (Brad Griffith 2006)
  • Fisheries Mangement (Christopher Guy 2006)
  • Quantitative Fisheries Management (Joseph Hightower 2006)
  • Management of Small Impoundments (Joseph Hightower 2006)
  • Ecology and Management of Riverine Systems (Elise Irwin 2006)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resource Professionals To help young scientists develop an advanced understanding of and appreciation for the components of effective written and oral scientific communication with a diverse group of
    constituents, including peers, supervisors, administrators, politicians, reporters, lawyers, and the lay public.

    Students are not expected to depart the course with fully developed advanced communication skills, as these skills evolve gradually over the course of a career. Instead, this course
    will provide students with a practical introduction to this topic as well as hands-on experience with disseminating research results at research conferences (i.e., giving oral presentations) and in peer-reviewed scientific journals (i.e., writing, editing, reviewing, and responding to criticism)
    (Cecil Jennings 2006)
  • Wildlife Health (Patrick Jodice 2006)
  • Restoration and Management of Wetlands (Sammy King 2006)
  • Floodplain Ecology, Restoration, and Management (Sammy King 2006)
  • Population Analysis of Animals Using Mark-Recapture Techniques (Bob Klaver 2006)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2006)
  • Current topics in the restoration of coastal Louisiana (Megan La Peyre 2006)
  • Biometry (Dan Magoulick 2006)
  • Conducting strong inference science (Thomas Martin 2006)
  • Ecology of Fishes (Martha Mather 2006)
  • Fish Physiology (Pat Mazik 2006)
  • Integrative Modeling of Natural and Social Systems (Dave McGuire 2006)
  • Management of Impounded River Basins (Leandro Miranda 2006)
  • Graduate Research Seminar (Mike Mitchell 2006)
  • Ecology of Fishes (Donna Parrish 2006)
  • Select Topics in Fisheries Science/Biology (Reynaldo Patiño 2006)
  • Physiological Ecology of Aquatic Organisms (Reynaldo Patiño 2006)
  • Select Topics in Fisheries Science/Biology (Reynaldo Patiño 2006)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Craig Paukert 2006)
  • Fisheries management and techniques (Craig Paukert 2006)
  • Terrestrial and aquatic linkages (Craig Paukert 2006)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2006)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2006)
  • Metapopulations and other advanced topics (Christine Ribic 2006)
  • Energetics and Nutrition of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2006)
  • Applied Biostatistics for Natural Resources (Paul Sievert 2014)
  • Biostatistics Journal Club (Paul Sievert 2006)
  • Animal BIology (W. David Walter 2006)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2006)
  • Freshwater Ecosystems Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2006)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2006)
  • Biology Seminar (Alexander Zale 2006)
  • Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management (Alexander Zale 2006)
  • Comparative Avian Nutrition (Alan Afton 2005)
  • Problems in Natural Resource Management (Alan Afton 2005)
  • Advanced Topics in Renewable Natural Resources (Alan Afton 2005)
  • Graduate Seminar in Wildlife (Alan Afton 2005)
  • Problems in Natural Resource Management (Alan Afton 2005)
  • Constructing Sustainability (Paul Angermeier 2005)
  • Advanced Tropical Ecology (co-taught with Gad Perry) (Clint Boal 2005)
  • Raptor Ecology and Management (Clint Boal 2005)
  • Biopolitics (Scott Bonar 2005)
  • Graduate Population Assessment (Phaedra Budy 2005)
  • Principles of Stream Restoration: Part I (Phaedra Budy 2005)
  • Aquatic Contaminants and Toxicology (Colleen Caldwell 2005)
  • Tropical Avian Biology (Jaime Collazo 2005)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Wildlife Ecology (Courtney Conway 2005)
  • Advanced Avian Habitat Selection (Courtney Conway 2005)
  • Conservation Genetics (Melanie Culver 2005)
  • Cultivating Diversity in the Natural Resources (Melanie Culver 2005)
  • Showcase of Promising Scientists in Natural Resources Seminar Series (Melanie Culver 2005)
  • Research Concepts (Stephen DeStefano 2005)
  • Research Concepts (Stephen DeStefano 2005)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2005)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2005)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2005)
  • Parameter Estimation in Population Ecology (Terri Donovan 2005)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2005)
  • Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (David Fulton 2005)
  • Economic and Social Aspects of Conservation Biology (1 lecture, invite (David Fulton 2005)
  • Ichthyology Systematics, evolution, life history, anatomy and physiology, distribution, ecology, and current literature of fishes. Laboratory study of morphology and identification of U.S. genera with a focus on regional species. (Tim Grabowski 2005)
  • Wildlife Population Analysis (Barry Grand 2005)
  • Wildlife Population Analysis (Barry Grand 2005)
  • Analysis of Wildlife Populations (Barry Grand 2005)
  • Special Topics Population Analysis (Barry Grand 2005)
  • Fisheries Management (Christopher Guy 2005)
  • Fisheries Management (Christopher Guy 2005)
  • Special Topics Lotic Ecology (Elise Irwin 2005)
  • Ecological Energetics (Patrick Jodice 2005)
  • Fish & Wildlife Seminar (David Krementz 2005)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2005)
  • Special topics: wetland sedimentation (Megan La Peyre 2005)
  • Current Issues in Natural Resources (Megan La Peyre 2005)
  • Integration of GIS and Remote Sensing Data in Natural Resource Applica (Cyndy Loftin 2005)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Dan Magoulick 2005)
  • Fish and Wildlife Seminar (Dan Magoulick 2005)
  • Fish Ecology (Dan Magoulick 2005)
  • Conducting strong inference science (Thomas Martin 2005)
  • Graduate Seminar Wildlife Biology (Thomas Martin 2005)
  • Ecological Interactions of Fishes, Spring 2005 (Martha Mather 2005)
  • Aquatic Toxicology (Pat Mazik 2005)
  • Ecological Background for Resilience and Adaptation (Dave McGuire 2005)
  • Advanced Fishery Science (Leandro Miranda 2005)
  • Aquaculture/Advanced Aquaculture (Reynaldo Patiño 2005)
  • Select Topics in Fisheries Science/Biology (Reynaldo Patiño 2005)
  • Special Problems: large river fisheries (Craig Paukert 2005)
  • Special Problems: large river fisheries (Craig Paukert 2005)
  • Open source computing for fisheries and wildlife studies (Jim Peterson, Michael Conroy, Christopher Fonnesbeck 2005)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2005)
  • Fisheries Science (Clay Pierce 2005)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2005)
  • Physiological Ecology of Vertebrates (Daniel Roby 2005)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 2005)
  • Conservation Biology (Francisco Vilella 2005)
  • Applied GIS in Natural Resources (Dan Dauwalter, William Fisher, W. David Walter 2005)
  • Quantitative Ecology (Stuart Welsh 2005)
  • Fisheries Science (Dana Winkelman 2005)
  • Population Dynamics (Dana Winkelman 2005)
  • Freshwater Foodwebs (Mark Wipfli 2005)
  • Conservation Biology (Petra Wood 2005)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2005)
  • Biology Seminar (Alexander Zale 2005)
  • Movements and Migration (Joseph Zydlewski 2005)
  • Behavioral Ecology (Alan Afton 2004)
  • Problems in Natural Resource Management (Alan Afton 2004)
  • Research Methodology and Proposal Writing (Alan Afton 2004)
  • Landscape Ecology (Craig Allen 2004)
  • Freshwater Biomonitoring (Paul Angermeier 2004)
  • Undergraduate Research (Paul Angermeier 2004)
  • Advanced Nongame Ecology and Management (Clint Boal 2004)
  • Fisheries Management and Ecology Seminar (Scott Bonar 2004)
  • Principles of Stream Restoration (Phaedra Budy 2004)
  • Graduate Fish Ecology (Phaedra Budy 2004)
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes (Colleen Caldwell 2004)
  • Biology and Conservation of Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Raymond Carthy 2004)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2004)
  • Aquatic Trophic Ecology (Steven Chipps 2004)
  • Ornithology (Courtney Conway 2004)
  • Conservation Genetics (Melanie Culver 2004)
  • Analysis of Animal Location Data (Duane Diefenbach 2004)
  • Population Dynamics and Modeling (Terri Donovan 2004)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2004)
  • Topics in Spatial Ecology (Thomas Edwards 2004)
  • Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (David Fulton 2004)
  • Economic and Social Aspects of Conservation Biology (1 lecture, invite (David Fulton 2004)
  • Special Problem - Analysis of Live/Dead Recapture/Recovery Data (Barry Grand 2004)
  • Foraging Ecology (Brad Griffith 2004)
  • Quantitative Fisheries Management (Joseph Hightower 2004)
  • Seminar in Aquatic Ecology (Joseph Hightower 2004)
  • Ecology and Management of Riverine Systems (Elise Irwin 2004)
  • Special Topics in Lotic Ecology (Elise Irwin 2004)
  • Foundations of Ecology (Patrick Jodice 2004)
  • Restoration and Management of Wetlands (Sammy King 2004)
  • Floodplain Ecology (Sammy King 2004)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2004)
  • Restoration Ecology (Megan La Peyre 2004)
  • Integration of GIS and remote sensing data analysis in natural resourc (Cyndy Loftin 2004)
  • Application of the Scientific Method to Current Graduate Research (Thomas Martin 2004)
  • Topics in Habitat Selection (Thomas Martin 2004)
  • Diadromous Fish, Fall 2004, Member of a multi-faculty team (Martha Mather 2004)
  • Social Conflict And Natural Resource Policy, Fall 2005 (with R. Muth) (Martha Mather 2004)
  • Fish Physiology (Pat Mazik 2004)
  • Integrative Modeling of Natural and Social Systems (Dave McGuire 2004)
  • Management of impounded river basins (Leandro Miranda 2004)
  • Spatial Ecology of Animals (Mike Mitchell 2004)
  • Ecology of Fishes (Donna Parrish 2004)
  • Physiological ecology of aquatic organisms (Reynaldo Patiño 2004)
  • Cell Biology (Reynaldo Patiño 2004)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Craig Paukert 2004)
  • Fisheries Management (Craig Paukert 2004)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2004)
  • Salmonids of the Pacific Northwest and Their Habitats (Jim Peterson 2004)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2004)
  • Ornithology (Abby Powell 2004)
  • Metapopulations and other advanced topics (Christine Ribic 2004)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2004)
  • Freshwater Foodwebs Seminar (Mark Wipfli 2004)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2004)
  • Ecology of Biological Invasions (Craig Allen 2003)
  • Analysis of Populations (David Andersen 2003)
  • Avian Conservation and Management (David Andersen 2003)
  • Graduate Seminar (Paul Angermeier 2003)
  • Biopolitics (Scott Bonar 2003)
  • Graduate Population Assessment (Phaedra Budy 2003)
  • Aquatic Contaminants and Toxicology (Colleen Caldwell 2003)
  • Avian Migration (Jaime Collazo 2003)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Wildlife Ecology (Courtney Conway 2003)
  • Conservation Genetics (Melanie Culver 2003)
  • Conservation Genetics (Terri Donovan 2003)
  • Ecosystem Management (Terri Donovan 2003)
  • Population Viability Analysis (Terri Donovan 2003)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2003)
  • Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (David Fulton 2003)
  • Analysis of Wildlife Populations (Barry Grand 2003)
  • Scale in Ecology and Management (Brad Griffith 2003)
  • Fisheries Management (Christopher Guy 2003)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resource Professionals To help young scientists develop an advanced understanding of and appreciation for the components of effective written and oral scientific communication with a diverse group of
    constituents, including peers, supervisors, administrators, politicians, reporters, lawyers, and the lay public.

    Students are not expected to depart the course with fully developed advanced communication skills, as these skills evolve gradually over the course of a career. Instead, this course
    will provide students with a practical introduction to this topic as well as hands-on experience with disseminating research results at research conferences (i.e., giving oral presentations) and in peer-reviewed scientific journals (i.e., writing, editing, reviewing, and responding to criticism)
    (Cecil Jennings 2003)
  • Management of Natural Resource Agencies (Cecil Jennings 2003)
  • Ecological Energetics (Patrick Jodice 2003)
  • Conservation Biology Course Instructor, Round River Conservation Studies: Conservation Biology, Otjiwarongo, Namibia
    (Matthew Kauffman 2003)
  • Wetlands in Peril (Wildlife Seminar) (Sammy King 2003)
  • Wetland Ecology and Management (Sammy King 2003)
  • Research in Field Zoology (David Krementz 2003)
  • Fisheries Techniques and Management (Thomas Kwak 2003)
  • Restoration Ecology (Megan La Peyre 2003)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Dan Magoulick 2003)
  • Thesis Research (Thomas Martin 2003)
  • Interpretation of Ecological Data (Martha Mather 2003)
  • Aquatic Toxicology (Pat Mazik 2003)
  • Ecological Background for Regional Resilience and Sustainability (Dave McGuire 2003)
  • Advanced Fisheries Science (Leandro Miranda 2003)
  • Ecology and Management of a Small Lake (Donna Parrish 2003)
  • Multivariate techniques for community/ecosystem-level studies (Jim Peterson 2003)
  • Readings in Conservation Biology (Abby Powell 2003)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2004)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 2003)
  • Quantitative Ecology (Stuart Welsh 2003)
  • Conservation Biology (Petra Wood 2003)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2003)
  • Fisheries Habitat Management (Alexander Zale 2003)
  • Behavioral Ecology (Alan Afton 2002)
  • Research Problems in Wildlife (Alan Afton 2002)
  • Selected or Assigned Wildlife Problem (Alan Afton 2002)
  • Landscape Ecology (Craig Allen 2002)
  • Analysis of Populatons (David Andersen 2002)
  • Freshwater Biomonitoring (Paul Angermeier 2002)
  • Freshwater Biomonitoring (Paul Angermeier 2002)
  • Advanced Nongame Ecology and Management (Clint Boal 2002)
  • Raptor Ecology and Management (Clint Boal 2002)
  • Advanced Fisheries Management Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences 525 (Scott Bonar 2002)
  • Conservation Biology (Phaedra Budy 2002)
  • Big River Management (Phaedra Budy 2002)
  • Fish Ecology (Phaedra Budy 2002)
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes (Colleen Caldwell 2002)
  • Critical Thinking in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (Raymond Carthy 2002)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2002)
  • Advanced Limnology (Steven Chipps 2002)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Wildlife Ecology (Courtney Conway 2002)
  • Independent Study in Comparative Analysis (Courtney Conway 2002)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2002)
  • Population Dynamics and Modeling (Terri Donovan 2002)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2002)
  • Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (David Fulton 2002)
  • Foraging Ecology (Brad Griffith 2002)
  • Quantitative Fisheries Management (Joseph Hightower 2002)
  • Seminar in Aquatic Ecology (Joseph Hightower, Thomas Kwak 2002)
  • Biology of Marine Birds (Patrick Jodice 2002)
  • Fisheries and Wildlife Inventory and Management (Thomas Kwak 2002)
  • Waterbird and Wetland Ecology (Cyndy Loftin 2002)
  • Special Problems: GIS (Cyndy Loftin 2002)
  • Research (Thomas Martin 2002)
  • Social Policy and Natural Resource Conflict (Martha Mather 2002)
  • Diadromous Fish (Martha Mather 2002)
  • Ecological Interactions of Fishes (Martha Mather 2002)
  • Fish Physiology (Pat Mazik 2002)
  • Regional Systems Dynamics and Modeling (Dave McGuire 2002)
  • Biological Aspects of Global Change (Dave McGuire 2002)
  • Ecology of Fishes (Donna Parrish 2002)
  • Physiological ecology of aquatic organisms (Reynaldo Patiño 2002)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2002)
  • SAS for Biologists (Jim Peterson 2002)
  • Fish Ecology (Clay Pierce 2002)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2002)
  • Endangered Species Management (Abby Powell 2002)
  • Nutrition and Energetics of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2002)
  • Biology of Marine Birds (Daniel Roby 2002)
  • Advanced Topics in Avian Ecology (Daniel Roby 2002)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2002)
  • Population Ecology (Dana Winkelman 2002)
  • Introduction to SAS (Petra Wood 2002)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2002)
  • Aquatic Ecology Seminar, BIOL 500 (Alexander Zale 2002)
  • Research Problems in Wildlife (Alan Afton 2001)
  • Selected or Assigned Wildlife Problems (Alan Afton 2001)
  • Research Problems in Wildlife (Alan Afton 2001)
  • Conservation Biology (Craig Allen 2001)
  • Appreciation of hunting and fishing in western culture (David Andersen 2001)
  • Appreciation of hunting and fishing traditions (cooperating instructor (David Andersen 2001)
  • Analysis of Populations (David Andersen 2001)
  • Advanced Nongame Ecology and Management (Clint Boal 2001)
  • Graduate Population Assessment (Phaedra Budy 2001)
  • Aquatic Contaminants and Toxicology (Colleen Caldwell 2001)
  • Special Topics in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (Raymond Carthy 2001)
  • Conceptual Foundations in Ecology (Courtney Conway 2001)
  • Independent Study in Behavioral Ecology (Courtney Conway 2001)
  • Suburban Wildlife Ecology (Stephen DeStefano 2001)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2001)
  • Population Dynamics and Modeling (Terri Donovan 2001)
  • Design and Analysis of Ecological Research (Thomas Edwards 2001)
  • Topics in Spatial Ecology (Thomas Edwards 2001)
  • Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (David Fulton 2001)
  • Wildlife Population Analysis (Barry Grand 2001)
  • Readings in Conservation Biology (Brad Griffith 2001)
  • Ecology and Management of Riverine Systems (Elise Irwin 2001)
  • Scientific Communication for Natural Resource Professionals To help young scientists develop an advanced understanding of and appreciation for the components of effective written and oral scientific communication with a diverse group of
    constituents, including peers, supervisors, administrators, politicians, reporters, lawyers, and the lay public.

    Students are not expected to depart the course with fully developed advanced communication skills, as these skills evolve gradually over the course of a career. Instead, this course
    will provide students with a practical introduction to this topic as well as hands-on experience with disseminating research results at research conferences (i.e., giving oral presentations) and in peer-reviewed scientific journals (i.e., writing, editing, reviewing, and responding to criticism)
    (Cecil Jennings 2001)
  • Aquatic Botany (Megan La Peyre 2001)
  • Applications of GIS and remote sensing techniques in natural resources (Cyndy Loftin 2001)
  • Interpretation of Ecological Data (Martha Mather 2001)
  • Aquatic Toxicology (Pat Mazik 2001)
  • Modeling of Biological Systems (Dave McGuire 2001)
  • Advanced Fishery Science (Leandro Miranda 2001)
  • Spatial Ecology of Animals (Mike Mitchell 2001)
  • Integrating Natural Science and Social Science (Donna Parrish 2001)
  • SAS for Biologists (Jim Peterson 2001)
  • Quantitative Approaches to Conservation Biology (Jim Peterson 2001)
  • Decision analysis under uncertainty (Jim Peterson, Michael Conroy 2001)
  • Metapopulations and other advanced topics (Christine Ribic 2001)
  • Conservation Biology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2001)
  • Graduate Seminars (Carl Schreck 2001)
  • Environmental Physiology of Fishes (Carl Schreck 2001)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 2001)
  • Advanced Ichthyology (Stuart Welsh 2001)
  • Fisheries Science (Dana Winkelman 2001)
  • Conservation Biology (Petra Wood 2001)
  • Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar (Petra Wood 2001)
  • Fisheries Habitat Management (Alexander Zale 2001)
  • Comparative Avian Nutrition (Alan Afton 2000)
  • Research Problems in Wildlife (Alan Afton 2000)
  • Selected or Assigned Wildlife Problems (Alan Afton 2000)
  • Freshwater Biomonitoring (Paul Angermeier 2001)
  • Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates (Steven Chipps 2000)
  • Advanced Limnology (Steven Chipps 2000)
  • Independent Study in Comparative Analysis (Courtney Conway 2001)
  • Advanced Fish and Wildlife Ecology (Courtney Conway 2000)
  • Estimation of Fish and Wildlife Population Parameters (Duane Diefenbach 2000)
  • Population Biology (Terri Donovan 2000)
  • Quantitative Fisheries Management (Joseph Hightower 2000)
  • Biological Conservation (Matthew Kauffman 2000)
  • Biological Field Methods Course Instructor, Utah State University (conducted in Otjiwarongo, Namibia) (Matthew Kauffman 2000)
  • Introduction to Ecological Modeling (Matthew Kauffman 2000)
  • Natural History Methods Course Instructor, Utah State University (conducted in Otjiwarongo, Namibia) (Matthew Kauffman 2000)
  • Conservation Biology in the Field Siskiyou Field Institute (Matthew Kauffman 2000)
  • Ecosystem Management (Bob Klaver 2000)
  • Ecological Interactions of Fishes (Martha Mather 2000)
  • Ecology and Conservation of Predators (Mike Mitchell 2000)
  • Fish Ecology (Clay Pierce 2000)
  • Stream Ecology (Clay Pierce 2000)
  • Nutrition and Physiological Ecology of Wildlife (Daniel Roby 2000)
  • Population Ecology (Dana Winkelman 2000)
  • Conservation Biology (Terri Donovan 1999)
  • Habitat Fragmentation (Terri Donovan 1999)
  • Women in Science and Environmental Professions (Terri Donovan 1999)
  • Population Biology (Terri Donovan 1999)
  • Design and analysis of wildlife survival studies (Barry Grand 1999)
  • General Ecology (Jim Long 1999)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 1999)
  • Conservation Biology Seminar (Terri Donovan 1998)
  • Population Biology - Darwin's Finches (Terri Donovan 1998)
  • Wildlife Ecology and Management (Terri Donovan 1998)
  • Population Ecology (Terri Donovan 1998)
  • Wildlife Ecology and Management (Terri Donovan 1997)
  • Ornithology (Ted Simons 1997)
  • General Biology (Jim Long 1996)
  • General Biology (Jim Long 1996)
  • General Biology (Jim Long 1995)
  • Readings in Wildlife Ecology Co-taught with Todd Fuller. Readings in evolutionary biology and carnivore conservation (John Organ 1995)
 

Current Staff

Federal Staff: 102

Masters Students: 247

Phd Students: 163

Post Docs: 55

University Staff: 266

5 Year Summary

Students graduated: 722

Scientific Publications: 1960

Presentations: 4355

Cooperative Research Units Program Headquarters Cooperators