Cooperative Research Units
Education, Research And Technical Assistance For Managing Our Natural Resources
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Andrew Taylor

Research Publications

  • Taylor, A., J.M. Long, M.R. Schwemm, M.D. Tringali, and S.K. Brewer. 2016. Identification of Neosho Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu velox)
    Stocks for Possible Introduction into Grand Lake, Oklahoma. Final Report to Environmental Department,
    The Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Cooperator Science Series 121-2016.
    Publisher Website | 
  • Taylor, A. T., and D. L. Peterson. 2015. Movement, homing, and fates of fluvial-specialist Shoal Bass following translocation into an impoundment. Southeastern Naturalist 14(3):425-437.
  • Alvarez, A., D. Peterson, A. Taylor, M. Tringali, and B. Barthel. 2015. Distribution and amount of hybridization between Shoal Bass Micropterus cataractae and the invasive Spotted Bass Micropterus punctulatus in the lower Flint River, GA. Pages 503-521 in Tringali et al. (Editors). Black Bass Diversity: Multidisciplinary Science for Conservation. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.
  • Freeman, B., A. Taylor, K. Oswald, J. Wares, M. Freeman, J. Quattro, and J. Leitner. 2015. Shoal basses, a clade of cryptic identity. Pages 449-466 in Tringali et al. (Editors). Black Bass Diversity: Multidisciplinary Science for Conservation. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.
  • Taylor, A. T., and D. L. Peterson. 2014. Shoal Bass life history and threats: a synthesis of current knowledge of a Micropterus species. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 25:159-167. Abstract |  Publisher Website | 
 

Current Staff

Federal Staff: 102

Masters Students: 247

Phd Students: 163

Post Docs: 55

University Staff: 266

5 Year Summary

Students graduated: 722

Scientific Publications: 1960

Presentations: 4355

 

Contact Us

Cooperative Research Units Program Headquarters Reston, VA 20192 Phone: (703) 648 - 4260 Fax: (703) 648 - 4269 Our University Web Site

Chief

John Organ
CRU Chief John Organ processing a Canada lynx kitten during a long term research collaboration between the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and the Fish and Wildlife Service.

John F. Organ is the Chief of the U.S.G.S. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units. He was Chief of Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration for the Northeast Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from 2005 to 2014, and worked in the FWS’s Ecological Services and National Wildlife Refuge programs during his 35 year career. He is also an Adjunct Associate Professor of Wildlife Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Michigan State University, and Andres Bello University in Santiago, Chile. He is a certified Wildlife Biologist and Past President and Fellow of The Wildlife Society. He is also a Professional Member of the Boone and Crockett Club and a Senior Specialist in the Fulbright Scholar Program. He is a member of the IUCN Otter Specialist and Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Groups, and an instructor and Advisory Board member of the Conservation Leaders for Tomorrow Program. He is also a consultant to the Peru Forest Sector Initiative where he is assisting the Peruvian government in training biologists and developing wildlife regulations. He advises M.S. and Ph.D. students studying carnivores and human dimensions in Africa, Canada, Chile, and the U.S. and teaches graduate courses in Wildlife Management and Conservation and Human Dimensions of Wildlife Conservation.

Links

  1. U.S. Geological Survey
  2. U.S. Geological Survey - Ecosystems
  3. U.S. Department of the Interior

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