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RAPID: Effects of a severe El Nino drought on survival, reproduction and population change across tropical songbird species that differ in average survival rates

Duration

November 2016 - October 2017

Narrative

RAPID: Effects of a severe El Nino drought on survival, reproduction and population change across tropical songbird species that differ in average survival rates
Overview.—A major prediction of life history theory is that selection should favor greater reductions in reproductive effort in the face of mortality risk in longer-lived compared with shorter-lived species. This response is thought to be favored by increased survival and future reproduction. Yet, some evidence suggests that survival may not be increased under severe conditions even when reproductive effort is reduced. Moreover, increased adult mortality and decreased reproduction may place long-lived species at disproportionately high risk of population decline and extinction. Yet, empirical tests of this paradigm are lacking across species that differ in their average survival rates, inhibiting our ability to resolve these alternatives and advance theory.

 

Current Staff

Federal Staff: 102

Masters Students: 247

Phd Students: 163

Post Docs: 55

University Staff: 266

5 Year Summary

Students graduated: 722

Scientific Publications: 1960

Presentations: 4355

 

Personnel

Funding Agencies

  • National Science Foundation

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