Cooperative Research Units
Education, Research And Technical Assistance For Managing Our Natural Resources
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Habitat Improvement Projects for Stream and Oxbow Fish of Greatest Conservation Need

Duration

January 2016 - June 2018

Narrative

This project will focus on habitat restorations and responses of stream fish of greatest conservation need (SGCN), specifically Topeka shiners (Notropis topeka) and plains topminnows (Fundulus sciadicus). Extensive GIS analysis using a new, state-of-the-art framework will be undertaken to assist in guiding current and future restoration efforts. Monitoring of the fish populations in an adaptive management approach will be necessary to ensure fish are responding as expected to efforts to increase and improve their habitat. Additional SGCN potentially benefitting from the work include banded darters (Etheostoma zonale), blacknose shiners (Notropis heterolepsis), Iowa darters (Etheostoma exile), blackside darters (Percina maculate), longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), slenderhead darters (Percina phoxocephala), slender madtoms (Noturus exilis), southern redbelly dace (Phoxinus erythrogaster), tadpole madtoms (Noturus gyrinus), and trout perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus). We will survey at least 20 sites in Iowa and Minnesota for Topeka shiners, plains topminnows, and habitat. Data will be collected on all fish species encountered. Genetic analysis of Topeka shiners and plains topminnows will be conducted through the use of microsatellite markers.

This project will also focus on habitat restorations and responses of stream fish of greatest conservation need (SGCN), specifically Topeka shiners (Notropis topeka) and plains topminnows (Fundulus sciadicus). Extensive GIS analysis using a new, state-of-the-art framework will be undertaken to assist in guiding current and future restoration efforts. Monitoring of the fish populations in an adaptive management approach will be necessary to ensure fish are responding as expected to efforts to increase and improve their habitat. Additional SGCN potentially benefitting from the work include banded darters (Etheostoma zonale), blacknose shiners (Notropis heterolepsis), Iowa darters (Etheostoma exile), blackside darters (Percina maculate), longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), slenderhead darters (Percina phoxocephala), slender madtoms (Noturus exilis), southern redbelly dace (Phoxinus erythrogaster), tadpole madtoms (Noturus gyrinus), and trout perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus). Species occurrence databases from both states will be compiled and combined to reveal locations where the two species have been documented as occurring. Minnesota’s Watershed Health Assessment Framework (WHAF) will be used in MN portions of the project area, and WHAF will be implemented in Iowa portions utilizing existing geospatial resources.

 

Current Staff

Federal Staff: 2

Masters Students: 3

Phd Students: 3

Post Docs: 0

University Staff: 9

5 Year Summary

Students graduated: 13

Scientific Publications: 42

Presentations: 47

 

Personnel

Funding Agencies

  • Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Links

Iowa Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Cooperators

  1. Iowa Department of Natural Resources
  2. Iowa State University
  3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  4. U.S. Geological Survey
  5. Wildlife Management Institute