Cooperative Research Units
Education, Research And Technical Assistance For Managing Our Natural Resources
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Montana Wildlife Theses and Dissertations

  • Ton, R. 2016. Ecological and physiological influences on altricial bird growth and development. PhD degree, University of Montana. 110 pages.
  • Hurley, M. 2016. MULE DEER POPULATION DYNAMICS IN SPACE AND TIME: ECOLOGICAL MODELING TOOLS FOR MANAGING UNGULATES.
  • LaManna, J. A. 2015. Predation risk and vegetation effects on avidan diversity, species turnover, reproduction and fitness. PhD degree, University of Montana. 182 pages
  • Crandall, R. 2014. Identifying environmental factors influencing Golden Eagle presence and reproductive success. M.S. degree, University of Montana.
  • Borg, N. 2013. Connectivity and Spatial Organization of Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep in Idaho. M.S. Thesis, University of Montana.
  • Daniel Barton – Ecological causes of life history variation tested by meta-analysis, comparison, and experimental approaches. Ph.D. dissertation, 2012.
  • Jimenez, B. S. 2012. Multiscale effects of forest roads on black bears (Ursus americanus). MS Thesis, University of Montana, Missoula.
  • Johnson, A. 2010. Habitat influences on avian diversity and reproductive success in western aspen forests. M.S. Thesis, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.
  • Rich, L. N. 2010. An assessment of territory size and the use of hunter surveys for monitoring wolves in Montana. MS Thesis, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.
  • Majewski, A. 2010. Importance of slow embryonic development in offspring and adult immune function. M.S. degree, University of Montana.
  • McCall, B. S. 2009. Noninvasive genetic sampling reveals black bear population dynamics driven by changes in food productivity. MS Thesis, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.
  • Sparklin, B. D. 2009. Territoriality and habitat selection of feral pigs on Fort Benning, Georgia, USA. MS Thesis, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.
  • Cheng, Y-r. 2008. Differential growth of body components among coexisting passerine species in response to nest predation risk. M.S. degree, University of Montana.
  • Hammond, C. A. M. 2208. A demographic and landscape analysis for common loons in northwest Montana. MS Thesis, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.
  • Hanson, L. B. 2006. Demography of feral pig populations at Fort Benning, Georgia. MS Thesis, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.
  • Reynolds, M. J. 2006. The effects of forest management on habitat quality for black bears in the southern Appalachian Mountains. PhD Dissertation, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.
  • Chalfoun, A. 2006. The role of spatial context in influencing fitness consequences and selection on habitat choice by a shrub-steppe bird. Ph.D. degree, University of Montana.
  • Fontaine, J. J. 2006. Ecological consequences of predation risk on phenotypic expression in coexisting species: experimental removal studies. Ph.D. degree, University of Montana.
  • Sharp, N. W. 2005. Demography of small mammal populations in longleaf pine undergoing restoration. MS Thesis, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.
  • Brongo, L. L. Demography of black bears in the Pisgah Bear Sanctuary. MS Thesis, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.
  • Gustafson, W. 2002. Assessing Landsat TM Imagery for Mapping and Monitoring Prairie Dog Colonies.
  • Gooch, G. C. 2001. Change Detection of the Sheyenne National Grasslands: Using Remote Sensing as a Conservation Tool. MS Thesis. University of Montana, Missoula, Montana. 40 pp.
  • Conway, C. J. 1998. Ecological and physiological constraints on avian incubation behavior and nest-site selection. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Montana, Missoula, Montana.
  • Mitchell, M. S. 1997. Optimal home ranges: models and application to black bears. PhD Dissertation, North Carolina State University, Raleigh.
  • Mitchell, M. S. 1992. Effects of intensive forest management on mammalian species in managed and unmanaged pocosins. MS Thesis, North Carolina State University, Raleigh.
 

Current Staff

Federal Staff: 2

Masters Students: 9

Phd Students: 9

Post Docs: 0

University Staff: 22

5 Year Summary

Students graduated: 8

Scientific Publications: 50

Presentations: 49

 

Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit Cooperators

  1. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks
  2. The University of Montana
  3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  4. U.S. Geological Survey
  5. Wildlife Management Institute