Cooperative Research Units
Education, Research And Technical Assistance For Managing Our Natural Resources
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New_York Education Activities

Courses Taught

  • Topics in Design and Analysis of Camera Trapping Studies We will read and discuss the camera trapping literature and identify key assumptions that are made regarding designing camera trap studies for occupancy and capture-recapture. We will place an emphasis on spatial processes and investigate sampling design choices (e.g., systematic random, simple random, clustered, trap spacing) and how they are affected by objectives and state variables of interest (e.g., species richness, diversity, abundance, density, site-level occupancy, species distribution, behavior, connectivity). The 2 credit option will explore implications of different design choices (e.g., what is optimal trap spacing under uniform and clustered designs for objectives related to density estimation vs. connectivity vs. occupancy? What is the best design when accounting for individual heterogeneity?) via simulation in the R programming environment, and will contribute to a group manuscript that will be published in the peer reviewed literature. (Angela Fuller 2018)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management Graduate seminar course that provides an introduction to the principles and practice of structured decision making and adaptive management and its application in natural resource management. Students become familiar with the application of quantitative decision modeling tools and apply these methods to natural resource problems. (Angela Fuller 2017)
  • Advanced Fisheries Research Methods In this graduate seminar, students will gain experience in conducting collaborative research in fisheries and aquatic science. Working jointly, we will analyze a dataset on round goby from Cayuga lake, a recent invader to the region with potential for significant trophic impacts to lake ecosystems. Results from this class will inform invasive fish management for inland lakes and Great Lakes in temperate North America.
    (Suresh Andrew Sethi 2017)
  • Landscape Genetics (Angela Fuller 2016)
  • Controversial Conservation Topics In this literature seminar, we will discuss a suite of controversial conservation topics, exploring different sides of the scientific debate surrounding these issues and exploring feedbacks among science, policy, management, and public perceptions. The objective of the class is to encourage students to think critically about the science behind conservation issues and be aware of the complex manner in which conservation issues are communicated across scientists, decision makers, and the public. The class will be divided into four topic sessions:
    • Status of global fisheries
    • Ecosystem reference baselines
    • Monetization of nature
    • Conservation triage
    (Suresh Andrew Sethi 2016)
  • Structured Decision Making in Natural Resource Management Graduate seminar course that provides an introduction to the principles and practice of structured decision making and adaptive management and its application in natural resource management. Students become familiar with the application of quantitative decision modeling tools and apply these methods to natural resource problems. (Angela Fuller 2015)
  • Ecological Thought: Theory and Principles This interdisciplinary graduate seminar course reviews some of the fundamental concepts and principles that have helped shape the science of ecology.We review foundational concepts and seminal papers in ecology and evolution, and use contemporary applications and developments to discuss how such thinking has evolved and why. (Angela Fuller 2014)
  • Structured Decision Making for Natural Resource Management (Angela Fuller 2012)
  • Structured Decision Making for Natural Resource Management This graduate seminar will provide an introduction to the principles and practice of structured decision making and its application in natural resource management. Students will become familiar with methods for finding optimal solutions to decision problems, and will apply these methods to natural resource problems.
    Students will become familiar with the application of quantitative decision modeling tools: single and multiple-objective trade-off techniques, decision trees, Bayesian belief and decision networks, linear programming, and optimization.
    (Angela Fuller 2011)
 

Current Staff

Federal Staff: 2

Masters Students: 4

Phd Students: 6

Post Docs: 4

University Staff: 2

5 Year Summary

Students graduated: 12

Scientific Publications: 55

Presentations: 87

 

Featured Student

Taylor Brown
Master's
Taylor Brown

New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Cooperators

  1. Cornell University
  2. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
  3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  4. U.S. Geological Survey
  5. Wildlife Management Institute