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THE EFFECTS OF WATER QUANTITY ON WATER QUALITY AND FISH COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN THE UPPER CIMARRON RIVER, OKLAHOMA

Duration

January 2011 - December 2014

Narrative

The Cimarron River flows 1,117 km from its origin in northeastern New Mexico to its confluence with the Arkansas River at the Keystone Reservoir in Oklahoma. The majority of this distance flows through Oklahoma, but there are brief forays into Colorado and Kansas. The Cimarron has been described as a large, undammed river, but closer inspection reveals that this statement is not entirely valid. Between the years of 1893-1905, in what would become Harper County, Oklahoma, the Settler’s Milling Canal and Reservoir Company dug a 22.53 km long irrigation canal that irrigated nearly 6000 acres of land for farming. The canal is typically 3.66 meters wide at the base and nears 18.29 meters feet wide at its banks. To feed this irrigation canal, an earthen dam was constructed that diverts the entire surface flow of the Cimarron River to the Old Settler’s Irrigation Canal. We are investigating fish species diversity among sections of the river as they differ in water quantity and quality as a result of the diversion.

Research Products and Activities

Thesis

  • Tanner, C.D. 2014. The effects of water quantity on fish assemblage composition in the upper Cimarron River. Master's thesis, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.
 

Current Staff

Federal Staff: 2

Masters Students: 8

Phd Students: 3

Post Docs: 1

University Staff: 11

5 Year Summary

Students graduated: 24

Scientific Publications: 84

Presentations: 184

 

Personnel

  • James LongPrincipal Investigator
  • Christopher TannerStudent

Funding Agencies

  • Tulsa Ecological Services

Links

Oklahoma Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Cooperators

  1. Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation
  2. Oklahoma State University
  3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  4. U.S. Geological Survey
  5. Wildlife Management Institute